Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A bitter, often prolonged quarrel or state of enmity, especially such a state of hostilities between two families or clans.
  • intransitive v. To carry on or perpetuate a bitter quarrel or state of enmity.
  • n. See fee.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A state of long-standing mutual hostility.
  • n. In professional wrestling, when two rival wrestlers engage in a series of matches; often has an angle tied to it.
  • v. To carry on a feud.
  • n. An estate granted to a vassal by a feudal lord in exchange for service

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A combination of kindred to avenge injuries or affronts, done or offered to any of their blood, on the offender and all his race.
  • n. A contention or quarrel; especially, an inveterate strife between families, clans, or parties; deadly hatred; contention satisfied only by bloodshed.
  • n. A stipendiary estate in land, held of a superior, by service; the right which a vassal or tenant had to the lands or other immovable thing of his lord, to use the same and take the profits thereof hereditarily, rendering to his superior such duties and services as belong to military tenure, etc., the property of the soil always remaining in the lord or superior; a fief; a fee.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Enmity; animosity; active hostility; a vengeful quarrel between individuals or parties; especially, hostility between families or parties in a state; a state of civic contention.
  • n. More specifically, an aggravated state of hostility, marked by frequent or occasional sanguinary conflicts, between one family or clan and another, to avenge insults, injuries, or murders inflicted by one party, or by any member of it, upon those of the other side; a vendetta.
  • n. In feudal law, an estate in land granted on condition of services to be rendered to the grantor, in default of which the land was to revert to the grantor; a fief; a tenure of land under and by dependence on a superior.
  • n. Land held in feudal tenure by a vassal.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. carry out a feud
  • n. a bitter quarrel between two parties

Etymologies

Alteration (probably influenced by feud2) of Middle English fede, from Old French faide, of Germanic origin.
Medieval Latin feudum, of Germanic origin; see peku- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English fede, feide, *feithe, from Old English fǣhþ, fǣhþu, fǣhþo ("hostility, enmity, violence, revenge, vendetta"), from Proto-Germanic *faihiþō (“hatred, enmity”), from Proto-Indo-European *pAik-, *pAig- (“ill-meaning, wicked”), equivalent to foe +‎ -th. Cognate with Dutch veete ("feud"), German Fehde ("feud, vendetta"), Danish fejde ("feud, enmity, hostility, war"), Swedish fejd ("feud, controversy, quarrel, strife"), and Old French faide, feide ("feud"), ultimately from the same Germanic source. Related to foe, fiend. (Wiktionary)
From Latin feodum. (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • "3. In feudal law, an estate in land granted on condition of services to be rendered to the grantor, in default of which the land was to revert to the grantor; a fief; a tenure of land under and by dependence on a superior. The grantor or lord was entitled to the homage or fealty of the grantee or vassal. The estate was so called in contradistinction to allodium, which is an estate subject to no superior but the general law of the land." --CD&C

    October 5, 2011