Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A container typically constructed with four sides perpendicular to the base and often having a lid or cover.
  • noun The amount or quantity that such a container can hold.
  • noun A square or rectangle.
  • noun A separated compartment in a public place of entertainment, such as a theater or stadium, for the accommodation of a small group.
  • noun An area of a public place, such as a courtroom or stadium, marked off and restricted for use by persons performing a specific function.
  • noun A small structure serving as a shelter.
  • noun Chiefly British A small country house used as a sporting lodge.
  • noun A box stall.
  • noun The raised seat for the driver of a coach or carriage.
  • noun An area on a diamond marked by lines designating where the batter may stand.
  • noun Any of various designated areas for other team members, such as the pitcher, catcher, and coaches.
  • noun A penalty box.
  • noun The penalty area on a soccer field.
  • noun Printing Featured printed matter enclosed by hairlines, a border, or white space and placed within or between text columns.
  • noun A hollow made in the side of a tree for the collection of sap.
  • noun A post office box.
  • noun An inbox.
  • noun An outbox.
  • noun An insulating, enclosing, or protective casing or part in a machine.
  • noun A signaling device enclosed in a casing.
  • noun A cable box.
  • noun Informal A television.
  • noun A very large portable radio.
  • noun Chiefly British A gift or gratuity, especially one given at Christmas.
  • noun An awkward or perplexing situation; a predicament.
  • noun Vulgar Slang The vulva and the vagina.
  • transitive verb To pack in a box.
  • transitive verb To confine in or as if in a box.
  • transitive verb To border or enclose with or as if with a box.
  • transitive verb To provide a housing or case for (a machine part, for example).
  • transitive verb To limit the activity or influence of by or as if by creating a restrictive structure or outlining a territory.
  • transitive verb Sports To block (a competitor or opponent) from advancing, especially to hinder an opponent from getting a rebound in basketball by placing oneself between the opponent and the basket.
  • transitive verb Nautical To boxhaul.
  • transitive verb To cut a hole in (a tree) for the collection of sap.
  • transitive verb To blend (paint) by pouring alternately between two containers.
  • transitive verb To change the shape of (a structure, such as a wall) by applying lath and plaster or boarding.
  • idiom (box the compass) To name the 32 points of the compass in proper order.
  • idiom (box the compass) To make a complete revolution or reversal.
  • idiom (in a box) In a very difficult or restrictive situation.
  • idiom (outside/outside of) In a strikingly unconventional or original way.
  • noun A slap or blow with the hand or fist.
  • intransitive verb To hit with the hand or fist.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, from Old English, from Late Latin buxis, from Greek puxis, from puxos, box tree.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, from Old English, from Latin buxus, from Greek puxos.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Middle English, from Old English, from Latin buxus, from Ancient Greek πύξος (puksos, "box tree").

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Middle English boxen ("to box, beat") and box ("a blow, a hit"), of unknown origin but apparently akin to Middle Dutch boke ("a blow, a hit"), Middle High German buc ("a blow"), Danish bask ("a blow"). See also Ancient Greek πύξ (pux), πυγμή (pugmē) (fist, pugilism)

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Old English box, from Proto-Germanic *buhsiz (cf. Dutch bus ("bush of a wheel"), German Büchse, Swedish hjulbössa ("wheel-box")), from Late Latin buxis ("box"), from Ancient Greek πυξίς (pyxis, "boxwood box"), from πύξος (pyxos, "box tree").

Examples

Comments

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  • It's getting cold, I'll catch the bus

    I saw my friend when she's finished working

    Get some fish and chips

    What's on the box?

    'Man about the house' with Paula Wilcox.

    (Photo Jenny, by Belle and Sebastian)

    December 31, 2008