Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A collection of items tied up or wrapped; a bundle.
  • n. A container made to be carried on the body of a person or animal.
  • n. The amount, as of food, that is processed and packaged at one time or in one season.
  • n. A small package containing a standard number of identical or similar items: a pack of matches.
  • n. A complete set of related items: a pack of cards.
  • n. Informal A large amount; a heap: earned a pack of money.
  • n. A group of animals, such as dogs or wolves, that run and hunt together.
  • n. A gang of people: a pack of hoodlums.
  • n. An organized troop having common interests: a Cub Scout pack. See Synonyms at flock1.
  • n. A mass of large pieces of floating ice driven together.
  • n. Medicine The swathing of a patient or a body part in hot, cold, wet, or dry materials, such as cloth towels, sheets, or blankets.
  • n. Medicine The materials so used.
  • n. Medicine A material, such as gauze, that is therapeutically inserted into a body cavity or wound; packing.
  • n. An ice pack; an ice bag.
  • n. A cosmetic paste that is applied to the skin, allowed to dry, and then rinsed off.
  • transitive v. To fold, roll, or combine into a bundle; wrap up.
  • transitive v. To put into a receptacle for transporting or storing: pack one's belongings.
  • transitive v. To fill up with items: pack one's trunk.
  • transitive v. To process and put into containers in order to preserve, transport, or sell: packed the fruit in jars.
  • transitive v. To bring together (persons or things) closely; crowd together: managed to pack 300 students into the lecture hall.
  • transitive v. To fill up tight; cram.
  • transitive v. Medicine To wrap (a patient) in a pack.
  • transitive v. Medicine To insert a pack into a body cavity or wound.
  • transitive v. To wrap tightly for protection or to prevent leakage: pack a valve stem.
  • transitive v. To press together; compact firmly: packed the clay and straw into bricks.
  • transitive v. Informal To carry, deliver, or have available for action: a thug who packed a pistol; a fighter who packs a hard punch.
  • transitive v. To send unceremoniously: The parents packed both children off to bed.
  • transitive v. To constitute (a voting panel) by appointment, selection, or arrangement in such a way that it is favorable to one's purposes or point of view; rig: "In 1937 Roosevelt threatened to pack the court” ( New Republic).
  • intransitive v. To place one's belongings in boxes or luggage for transporting or storing.
  • intransitive v. To be susceptible of compact storage: Dishes pack more easily than glasses.
  • intransitive v. To form lumps or masses; become compacted.
  • idiom pack it in Informal To cease work or activity: Let's pack it in for the day.
  • n. Variant of pac.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A bundle made up and prepared to be carried; especially, a bundle to be carried on the back; a load for an animal; a bale, as of goods.
  • n. A number or quantity equal to the contents of a pack; hence, a multitude; a burden.
  • n. A number or quantity of connected or similar things; a collective.
  • n. A full set of playing cards; also, the assortment used in a particular game; as, a euchre pack.
  • n. A number of hounds or dogs, hunting or kept together.
  • n. A number of persons associated or leagued in a bad design or practice; a gang;
  • n. A group of Cub Scouts.
  • n. A shook of cask staves.
  • n. A bundle of sheet-iron plates for rolling simultaneously.
  • n. A large area of floating pieces of ice driven together more or less closely.
  • n. An envelope, or wrapping, of sheets used in hydropathic practice, called dry pack, wet pack, cold pack, etc., according to the method of treatment.
  • n. : A loose, lewd, or worthless person.
  • n. A tight group of object balls in cue sports. Usually the reds in snooker.
  • n. The team on the field.
  • v. To make a pack of; to arrange closely and securely in a pack; hence, to place and arrange compactly as in a pack; to press into close order or narrow compass;
  • v. To fill in the manner of a pack, that is, compactly and securely, as for transportation; hence, to fill closely or to repletion; to stow away within; to cause to be full; to crowd into; as,
  • v. To sort and arrange (the cards) in a pack so as to secure the game unfairly.
  • v. To bring together or make up unfairly and fraudulently, in order to secure a certain result
  • v. To contrive unfairly or fraudulently; to plot.
  • v. To load with a pack; hence, to load; to encumber
  • v. To cause to go; to send away with baggage or belongings; especially, to send away peremptorily or suddenly; – sometimes with off. See pack off
  • v. To transport in a pack, or in the manner of a pack (i. e., on the backs of men or animals).
  • v. To envelop in a wet or dry sheet, within numerous coverings.
  • v. To render impervious, as by filling or surrounding with suitable material, or to fit or adjust so as to move without giving passage to air, water, or steam
  • v. To make up packs, bales, or bundles; to stow articles securely for transportation.
  • v. To admit of stowage, or of making up for transportation or storage; to become compressed or to settle together, so as to form a compact mass; as, the goods pack conveniently; wet snow packs well.
  • v. To gather in flocks or schools; as, the grouse or the perch begin to pack.
  • v. To depart in haste; – generally with off or away.
  • v. To unite in bad measures; to confederate for ill purposes; to join in collusion.
  • v. To carry weapons, especially firearms, on one's person.
  • v. To block a shot, especially in basketball.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A pact.
  • n. A bundle made up and prepared to be carried; especially, a bundle to be carried on the back; a load for an animal; a bale, as of goods.
  • n. A number or quantity equal to the contents of a pack; hence, a multitude; a burden.
  • n. A group or quantity of connected or similar things
  • n. A full set of playing cards; a deck; also, the assortment used in a particular game.
  • n. A number of wolves, hounds or dogs, hunting or kept together.
  • n. A number of persons associated or leagued in a bad design or practice; a gang.
  • n. A shook of cask staves.
  • n. A bundle of sheet-iron plates for rolling simultaneously.
  • n. A large area of floating pieces of ice driven together more or less closely.
  • n. An envelope, or wrapping, of sheets used in hydropathic practice, called dry pack, wet pack, cold pack, etc., according to the method of treatment.
  • n. A loose, lewd, or worthless person. See Baggage.
  • n. In hydropathic practice, a wrapping of blankets or sheets called dry pack, wet pack, cold pack, etc., according to the condition of the blankets or sheets used, put about a patient to give him treatment; also, the fact or condition of being so treated.
  • n. The forwards who compose one half of the scrummage; also, the scrummage.
  • transitive v. To make a pack of; to arrange closely and securely in a pack; hence, to place and arrange compactly as in a pack; to press into close order or narrow compass.
  • transitive v. To fill in the manner of a pack, that is, compactly and securely, as for transportation; hence, to fill closely or to repletion; to stow away within; to cause to be full; to crowd into
  • transitive v. To shuffle, sort and arrange (the cards) in a pack so as to secure the game unfairly; to stack{3} (the deck).
  • transitive v. To bring together or make up unfairly and fraudulently, in order to secure a certain result; to stack{3}.
  • transitive v. To contrive unfairly or fraudulently; to plot.
  • transitive v. To load with a pack; hence, to load; to encumber.
  • transitive v. To cause to go; to send away with baggage or belongings; esp., to send away peremptorily or suddenly; to send packing; -- sometimes with off.
  • transitive v. To transport in a pack, or in the manner of a pack (i. e., on the backs of men or beasts).
  • transitive v. To envelop in a wet or dry sheet, within numerous coverings. See Pack, n., 5.
  • transitive v. To render impervious, as by filling or surrounding with suitable material, or to fit or adjust so as to move without giving passage to air, water, or steam
  • transitive v. To cover, envelop, or protect tightly with something
  • intransitive v. To make up packs, bales, or bundles; to stow articles securely for transportation.
  • intransitive v. To admit of stowage, or of making up for transportation or storage; to become compressed or to settle together, so as to form a compact mass
  • intransitive v. To gather in flocks or schools.
  • intransitive v. To depart in haste; -- generally with off or away.
  • intransitive v. To unite in bad measures; to confederate for ill purposes; to join in collusion.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A bundle of anything inclosed in a wrapping or bound fast with cords; especially, a bundle or bale made up to be carried on the back of man or beast: in modern times applied especially to such a bale carried by a peddler.
  • n. A collection; a budget; a stock or store: as, a pack of troubles; a pack of lies.
  • n. A bundle of some particular kind or quantity.
  • n. A complete set, as of playing-cards (52 in number), or the number used in any particular game.
  • n. A number of animals herded together by gregarious instinct for combined defense or offense (as a pack of wolves), or kept together for hunting in company (as a pack of hounds).
  • n. A set or gang (of people): used derogatorily, and especially of persons banded together in some notorious practice, or characterized by low ways: as, a pack of thieves.
  • n. A person of low character: as, a naughty pack.
  • n. A considerable area of floating ice in the polar seas, more or less flat, broken into large pieces by the action of wind and waves, and driven together in an almost continuous and nearly coherent mass.
  • n. In hydrotherapy, a wet sheet with other covering for closely enveloping the body or a part of it; the process of thus wrapping, or the state of being so wrapped.
  • n. In the fisheries:
  • n. In coal-mining, a wall of rough stone or of blocks of coal built for the purpose of supporting the roof.
  • n. Synonyms
  • n.
  • n.
  • n.
  • n.
  • To put together compactly in a bundle, bale, package, box, barrel, or other receptacle, especially for transportation, or convenience in storing or stowing; make up into a package, bale, bundle, etc.: as, to pack one's things for a journey.
  • To fill with things arranged more or less methodically; stow: as, to pack a chest or a hamper.
  • To arrange or dispose with a view to future use and activity; especially, to prepare and put up in suitable vessels for preservation, or in a form suitable for market: as, to pack herrings; to pack pork, fruit, eggs, etc.
  • In hydrotherapy, to envelop (the body or some part of it) in wet cloths, which may be covered over with dry ones.
  • To stuff an interstice or space with something that will render it air-, vapor-, or water-tight; make air-tight, steam-tight, etc., by stuffing: as, to pack a joint, or the piston of a steam-engine.
  • To force or press down or together firmly; compact, as snow, ice, earth, sand, or any loose or floating material.
  • To assemble or bring together closely and compactly; crowd, as persons in a room or a vehicle.
  • To bring together, arrange with, or manipulate (cards, persons, facts, statements, etc.) so as to serve one's own purposes; manipulate.
  • To bring together (the persons who are to constitute some deliberative body) improperly and corruptly, with the view of promoting or deciding in favor of some particular interest or party: as, to pack a jury; to pack a committee.
  • To carry on the back; transport on the backs of men or beasts.
  • To load with a pack or packs.
  • To send off or away summarily; specifically, to dismiss or discharge from one's employment: with off, away, etc.: as, to pack off an impudent servant.
  • To engage in putting together or stowing goods, etc., in packs, bundles, bales, boxes, barrels, etc., for transportation or storage.
  • In mining, to strike light blows on the edge of the keeve, so as to assist the separation of the ore from the veinstone. See toss.
  • To admit of being stowed or put together in an orderly arrangement in small compass: as, the goods pack well.
  • To settle into a compact mass; become compacted or firmly pressed: as, wet snow packs readily.
  • To gather together in packs, flocks, or bands: as, the grouse begin to pack.
  • To depart in haste, as when summarily dismissed; be off at once: generally with off, away, etc.
  • n. An agreement or compact; a pact.
  • To form a pact; especially, to confederate for bad purposes; join in collusion.
  • To plot; contrive fraudulently.
  • To join in collusion; ally for some bad purpose.
  • Intimate; confidential; “thick.”
  • n. In tanning, a workmen's name for a lot of hides placed in the same pit to undergo the liming process.
  • To have in one's baggage, that is, in one's possession; possess.
  • To transport goods as a business: as, to pack over the trail.
  • n. A moccasin made of hide prepared with tallow and wax, used by various North American Indian tribes.
  • n. A heavy felt or waterproof half-boot worn by loggers in the lumber-camps in winter.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. press tightly together or cram
  • v. press down tightly
  • v. set up a committee or legislative body with one's own supporters so as to influence the outcome
  • v. seal with packing
  • v. load with a pack
  • n. an exclusive circle of people with a common purpose
  • v. hike with a backpack
  • n. an association of criminals
  • v. have with oneself; have on one's person
  • v. carry, as on one's back
  • n. a complete collection of similar things
  • v. treat the body or any part of it by wrapping it, as with blankets or sheets, and applying compresses to it, or stuffing it to provide cover, containment, or therapy, or to absorb blood
  • n. a convenient package or parcel (as of cigarettes or film)
  • v. compress into a wad
  • n. a bundle (especially one carried on the back)
  • v. arrange in a container
  • n. a sheet or blanket (either dry or wet) to wrap around the body for its therapeutic effect
  • v. fill to capacity
  • v. have the property of being packable or of compacting easily
  • n. a large indefinite number
  • n. a cream that cleanses and tones the skin
  • n. a group of hunting animals

Etymologies

Middle English pak, possibly of Low German origin.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English pak (Wiktionary)

Examples

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