Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To depart from; leave: "You and I are on the point of quitting the theater of our exploits” ( Horatio Nelson).
  • transitive v. To leave the company of: had to quit the gathering in order to be home by midnight.
  • transitive v. To give up; relinquish: quit a job.
  • transitive v. To abandon or put aside; forsake: advised them to quit their dissipated ways.
  • transitive v. To cease or discontinue: asked them to quit talking; quit smoking.
  • transitive v. Computer Science To exit (an application).
  • transitive v. To rid oneself of by paying: quit a debt.
  • transitive v. To release from a burden or responsibility.
  • transitive v. To conduct (oneself) in a specified way: Quit yourselves like adults.
  • intransitive v. To cease performing an action. See Synonyms at stop.
  • intransitive v. To give up, as in defeat; stop.
  • intransitive v. To leave a job.
  • adj. Absolved of a duty or an obligation; free.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To pay (a debt, fine etc.).
  • v. To repay (someone) for (something).
  • v. To repay, pay back (a good deed, injury etc.).
  • v. To conduct oneself, acquit oneself, to behave (in a specified way).
  • v. To abandon, renounce (a thing).
  • v. To leave (a place).
  • v. To resign from (a job, office, position, etc.).
  • v. To stop, give up (an activity) (usually + gerund or verbal noun).
  • v. To close (an application).
  • v. Simple past tense and past participle of quit.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Any one of numerous species of small passerine birds native of tropical America. See Banana quit, under banana, and guitguit.
  • adj. Released from obligation, charge, penalty, etc.; free; clear; absolved; acquitted.
  • transitive v. To set at rest; to free, as from anything harmful or oppressive; to relieve; to clear; to liberate.
  • transitive v. To release from obligation, accusation, penalty, or the like; to absolve; to acquit.
  • transitive v. To discharge, as an obligation or duty; to meet and satisfy, as a claim or debt; to make payment for or of; to requite; to repay.
  • transitive v. To meet the claims upon, or expectations entertained of; to conduct; to acquit; -- used reflexively.
  • transitive v. To carry through; to go through to the end.
  • transitive v. To have done with; to cease from; to stop; hence, to depart from; to leave; to forsake
  • intransitive v. To go away; to depart; to stop doing a thing; to cease.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Discharged or released from a debt, penalty, or obligation; on even terms; absolved; free; clear.
  • To satisfy, as a claim or debt; discharge, as an obligation or duty; make payment for or of; pay; repay; requite.
  • To set free; release; absolve; acquit; exonerate.
  • To free, as from something harmful or oppressing; relieve; clear; liberate: with of.
  • To meet the claims upon, or expectations entertained of; conduct; acquit: used reflexively.
  • To complete; spend: said of time.
  • To depart from; go away from; leave.
  • To resign; give up; let go.
  • To forsake; abandon.
  • In archery, to discharge; shoot.
  • To extract; get rid of.
  • To remove by force.
  • To cease; stop; give over.
  • Synonyms and Desert, Abandon, etc. See forsake.
  • n. Same as queet.
  • n. The popular name of numerous small birds of Jamaica, belonging to different genera and families.
  • n. A term introduced by Professor H. A. Newton to denote the point on the celestial sphere from which the motion of a body is at any moment directed: thus, the earth's quit is always a point on the ecliptic about 90° east of the sun. The quit is opposite to the goal. See goal, 7.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. turn away from; give up
  • v. go away or leave
  • v. give up in the face of defeat of lacking hope; admit defeat
  • v. put an end to a state or an activity
  • v. give up or retire from a position

Etymologies

Middle English quiten, to release, from Old French quiter, from Medieval Latin quiētāre, quītāre, from Latin quiētus, at rest; see quiet.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Anglo-Norman quiter, Old French quiter, from quite ("acquited, quit"), ultimately from Latin quietus. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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