Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • transitive verb To deceive or drop (a lover) suddenly or callously.
  • noun One who discards a lover.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun One who discards another, after holding the relation of a lover.
  • To discard after treating or encouraging as a lover; trick in love.
  • To play the jilt; practise deception in love.
  • noun Same as gillet.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • transitive verb To cast off capriciously or unfeelingly, as a lover; to deceive in love.
  • noun A woman who capriciously deceives her lover; a coquette; a flirt.
  • intransitive verb To play the jilt; to practice deception in love; to discard lovers capriciously.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A woman who jilts a lover.
  • verb transitive To cast off capriciously or unfeelingly, as a lover; to deceive in love.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a woman who jilts a lover
  • verb cast aside capriciously or unfeelingly

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Possibly from obsolete jilt, harlot, alteration of gillot, diminutive of gille, woman, girl, from Middle English; see gill.]

Examples

  • You really -- Oh! my dear Lady Trant, this must not go farther -- and positively the word jilt must never be used again; for I'm confident it is quite inapplicable. "

    Tales and Novels — Volume 07

  • To "jilt," to throw or dash water on a person; "gellock" (gavelock), an iron lever or crowbar.

    The Proverbs of Scotland

  • "I am to request you will not use the word 'jilt' and Miss Ashton's name together," said Bucklaw, gravely.

    The Bride of Lammermoor

  • Clearly, the bureaucrats at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs were scared by the political pressure to jilt the United States.

    The Good Fight

  • Clearly, the bureaucrats at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs were scared by the political pressure to jilt the United States.

    The Good Fight

  • Clearly, the bureaucrats at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs were scared by the political pressure to jilt the United States.

    The Good Fight

  • Rather than jilt the lads, another finale was added for Jan. 13.

    China's Little Punk Rock Club That Could

  • But the Man whom the gadfly Flory page used as a jilt allways do, turn'd him off without sense or feeling, has determind it seems to have one of the family, and has strap'd himself for life to her Sister Nancy!

    Letter 266

  • When air travel nosedives, as it did over the past two years, carriers jilt airports by dropping routes and frequencies.

    'Speed Dating' for Airports, Airlines

  • To which one might say: "Oh stop putting up with it, Kate, and if you ever get the chance, jilt the arrogant blighter."

    I do hope Kate Middleton has a cunning plan

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • noun: one who capriciously or unfeelingly drops a lover.

    March 14, 2007

  • Formerly: a loose, unchaste woman: harlot.

    December 19, 2007

  • ...I wonder I could not distinguish the behaviour of the unmatron-like jilt whom thou broughtest to betray me, from the worthy lady whom thou hast the honour to call thy aunt...

    Clarissa Harlowe (as quoted by Lovelace), Clarissa by Samuel Richardson

    December 19, 2007

  • I care little for the pleasures of the table; I only play for my amusement; and I have given up women. There is no chance of my being reckoned, in my old age, among those libidinous grey-beards to whom jilts sell their favours by troy weight.

    - Lesage, The Adventures of Gil Blas of Santillane, tr. Smollett, bk 3 ch. 1

    September 13, 2008