Definitions

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun an actor who travels around the country presenting plays

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • One time he would be a playactor, then a sutler or a welsher, then nought would keep him from the bearpit and the cocking main, then he was for the ocean sea or to hoof it on the roads with the romany folk, kidnapping a squire's heir by favour of moonlight or fecking maids 'linen or choking chicken behind a hedge.

    Ulysses

  • "No; I wouldn't be willin 'to see you a playactor," he said, "walkin 'round in skin tights, with your face all painted up."

    Calvary Alley

  • 'I strove to transform myself into another man, and, like a playactor, to reassume the character, manners and emotions of a past period.

    Renaissance in Italy, Volumes 1 and 2 The Catholic Reaction

  • "I didna ken ye," said Blue Peter, "in sic playactor kin 'o' claes."

    The Marquis of Lossie

  • 'But he needna hae gane aboot it in sic a playactor-like gait.

    Robert Falconer

  • Stephen scripts Bloom as a tragic anti-hero, but Penelope, as much a storyteller as Stephen and a playactor as Bloom, does some improvising of her own (in true screwball fashion), and she just may be the rewrite he's been waiting for.

    GreenCine Daily

  • Stephen scripts Bloom as a tragic anti-hero, but Penelope, as much a storyteller as Stephen and a playactor as Bloom, does some improvising of her own (in true screwball fashion), and she just may be the rewrite he's been waiting for.

    GreenCine Daily

  • Stephen scripts Bloom as a tragic anti-hero, but Penelope, as much a storyteller as Stephen and a playactor as Bloom, does some improvising of her own (in true screwball fashion), and she just may be the rewrite he's been waiting for.

    GreenCine Daily

  • One time he would be a playactor, then a sutler or a welsher, then nought would keep him from the bearpit and the cocking main, then he was for the ocean sea or to hoof it on the roads with the romany folk, kidnapping a squire’s heir by favour of moonlight or fecking maids’ linen or choking chicken behind a hedge.

    Ulysses

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