Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To set in firmly, as into the ground: implant fence posts.
  • transitive v. To establish securely, as in the mind or consciousness; instill: habits that had been implanted early in childhood.
  • transitive v. Medicine To insert or embed (an object or a device) surgically: implant a drug capsule; implant a pacemaker.
  • transitive v. Medicine To graft or insert (a tissue) within the body.
  • intransitive v. Embryology To become attached to and embedded in the uterine lining. Used of a fertilized egg.
  • n. Something implanted, especially a surgically implanted tissue or device: a dental implant; a subcutaneous implant.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To fix firmly or set securely or deeply.
  • v. To insert (something) surgically into the body.
  • v. Of an embryo, to become attached to and embedded in the womb.
  • n. Anything surgically implanted in the body, such as a tissue graft or prosthesis, particularly breast implants.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To plant, or infix, for the purpose of growth; to fix deeply; to instill; to inculate; to introduce.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To plant, set, fix, or lodge; cause to take root or form a vital union: with in: as, to implant living tissue from one part of the body in another; to implant sound principles in the mind.
  • To cause to be supplied or enriched; imbue or endow: with with.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. put firmly in the mind
  • v. fix or set securely or deeply
  • n. a prosthesis placed permanently in tissue
  • v. become attached to and embedded in the uterus

Etymologies

Middle English implanten, from Medieval Latin implantāre : Latin in-, in; see in-2 + Latin plantāre, to plant (from planta, a shoot; see plant).
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin implantō. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Even if you think the metal implant is compatible with the MRI machine, you must let the MRI personnel know in order to ensure this metal is compatible.

    mri | clusterflock

  • P.S. Tudyk had a cut on his head … was that from his wound last week or was it a brain implant … hmmmmmmmmmm!

    Tonight's 'V': Take Me To Your Figuratively Hot Yet Physiologically Cold-Blooded Leader! | EW.com

  • She has warned me that for safety reasons an implant is usually an 18 month process from start to finish, and the cost here is about $2,1000Pesos each (1,620 US Dollars).

    Dental Tourism

  • Now, the first ever nanotitanium medical implant is FDA-approved for human applications -- meaning it can be inserted into the human body -- and will begin distribution in the U.S. and Russia almost immediately.

    Using Cold War Tech For Peacetime Healing

  • The cochlear implant is an electronic device that can provide auditory sensation to a person with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss.

    Cochlear Implant Program

  • Does she commun icate through some kind of brain implant?

    SciFi, Fantasy & Horror Collectibles - Part 1245

  • The implant is made of titanium and is capable of "surviving" within the corrosive environment of the salty fluid within the eye.

    Thoughts: Bio-Electronic Implant

  • The unique trabecular configuration is conducive to more normal bone formation and bone in-growth, decreased stress-shielding, and the potential for improved long term implant fixation.

    RedOrbit News - Technology

  • "This was the first demonstration that a tissue-engineered vascular graft that did not have any sort of synthetic support could provide the strength and durability for long-term implant," said lead researcher Todd N. McAllister, from Cytograft Tissue Engineering in Novato, Calif., the creators of the new shunts.

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  • The unique, highly porous trabecular configuration is conducive to more normal bone formation and bone in-growth, decreased stress-shielding, and the potential for improved long term implant fixation.

    Health News from Medical News Today

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