Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A cloth used to wrap a body for burial; a winding sheet.
  • noun Something that conceals, protects, or screens.
  • noun Nautical One of a set of ropes or wire cables stretched from the masthead to the sides of a vessel to support the mast.
  • noun A similar supporting line for a smokestack or comparable structure.
  • noun One of the ropes connecting the harness and canopy of a parachute.
  • intransitive verb To wrap (a corpse) in burial clothing.
  • intransitive verb To envelop and obscure or shut off from sight: synonym: block.
  • intransitive verb To envelop or be associated with and make difficult to understand.
  • intransitive verb Archaic To shelter; protect.
  • intransitive verb To take cover; find shelter.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun One of a set of strong ropes extending from a ship's mastheads to each side of the ship to support the mast.
  • To lop the branches from; trim, as a tree.
  • noun A garment; a covering of the nature of a garment; something which envelops and conceals; clothing.
  • noun A winding-sheet; a piece of linen or other cloth in which a dead body is enveloped; hence, by extension, a garment for the dead, as a long white robe or gown, prepared expressly for the burial.
  • noun Protection.
  • noun A place of shelter; covert; retreat.
  • noun A place under ground, as the burrow of an animal, a vault, the crypt of a church, etc.: sometimes in the plural, used collectively as a singular.
  • noun One of the two annular plates at the periphery of a water-wheel which form the sides of the buckets.
  • noun In machinery: A rim or flange cast on the ends of the teeth of a gear-wheel, so that they appear to be formed entirely or partly in the solid periphery of the wheel.
  • noun In an undershot wheel, the cylindrical surface at the inner circumference or bottom of the bucket.
  • noun The name given to the legendary portrait of Christ which is supposed to have been imprinted on the shroud in which he was wrapped in the tomb.
  • To cover as with a garment or veil; especially, to clothe (a dead body) for burial.
  • To clothe one's self in; put on.
  • To cover or deck as with a garment; overspread; inclose; envelop.
  • To cover so as to disguise or conceal; veil; obscure.
  • To shelter; screen; hide.
  • To put one's self under cover; take shelter.
  • To gather together, as beasts do for warmth.
  • noun A cutting, as of a tree or plant; a slip.
  • noun A bough; a branch; hence, collectively, the branching top or foliage of a tree.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • intransitive verb obsolete To take shelter or harbor.
  • noun That which clothes, covers, conceals, or protects; a garment.
  • noun Especially, the dress for the dead; a winding sheet.
  • noun That which covers or shelters like a shroud.
  • noun obsolete A covered place used as a retreat or shelter, as a cave or den; also, a vault or crypt.
  • noun rare The branching top of a tree; foliage.
  • noun (Naut.) A set of ropes serving as stays to support the masts. The lower shrouds are secured to the sides of vessels by heavy iron bolts and are passed around the head of the lower masts.
  • noun (Mach.) One of the two annular plates at the periphery of a water wheel, which form the sides of the buckets; a shroud plate.
  • noun (Naut.) ropes extending from the head of the bowsprit to the sides of the vessel.
  • noun (Naut.) iron rods connecting the topmast rigging with the lower rigging, passing over the edge of the top.
  • noun (Naut.), (Mach.) A shroud. See def. 7, above.
  • transitive verb Prov. Eng. To lop. See shrood.
  • transitive verb To cover with a shroud; especially, to inclose in a winding sheet; to dress for the grave.
  • transitive verb To cover, as with a shroud; to protect completely; to cover so as to conceal; to hide; to veil.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun That which clothes, covers, conceals, or protects; a garment.
  • noun Especially, the dress for the dead; a winding sheet.
  • noun That which covers or shelters like a shroud.
  • noun A covered place used as a retreat or shelter, as a cave or den; also, a vault or crypt.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English schrud, garment, from Old English scrūd.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Old English scrūd, cognate with Old Norse skrúð ("the shrouds of a ship") ( > Danish, Norwegian skrud ("splendid attire")).

Examples

  • But she showed me, too, her shroud -- her _shroud_!

    The Brass Bound Box

  • The case of the Turin shroud is here symptomal: its authenticity would be awful for every true believer (the first thing to do then would be to analyze the DNA of the blood stains and thus solve empirically the question of who Jesus 'father was ...), while a true fundamentalist would rejoice in this opportunity.

    Odometer

  • The case of the Turin shroud is here symptomal: its authenticity would be awful for every true believer (the first thing to do then would be to analyze the DNA of the blood stains and thus solve empirically the question of who Jesus 'father was ...), while a true fundamentalist would rejoice in this opportunity.

    Archive 2008-09-01

  • First of all, the payload shroud is simply not as roomy -- i.e. useful --- as that upon ARES V.

    Shuttle-C - NASA Watch

  • The shroud is interesting to me because it is a very old legitimate medieval hoax.

    Archive 2004-04-01

  • The shroud is interesting to me because it is a very old legitimate medieval hoax.

    All we need is Blog?

  • "None other shroud is worthy of thy virtues!" cried he.

    The Scottish Chiefs

  • Many Catholics look to Rome for direction on how to evaluate the shroud, as Pope John Paul II discovered en route to Africa in 1989, when he called the shroud a "relic."

    Latest Articles

  • The shrouds used to cover the faces of the dead were often decayed by bacteria in the mouth, revealing the corpse's teeth, and vampires became known as shroud-eaters.

    The Financial Express

  • Tears did not fall from her father’s eyes — not then, as her mother gasped her last; not later, when she herself wailed lustily at the indignity of being thrust out of the womb; and not after, when both mother and child were each bundled as appropriate, in shroud and blanket respectively.

    Archive 2003-01-01

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