Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A sheltered part of a body of water deep enough to provide anchorage for ships.
  • n. A place of shelter; a refuge.
  • transitive v. To give shelter to: harbor refugees; harbor a fugitive.
  • transitive v. To provide a place, home, or habitat for: a basement that harbors a maze of pipes; streams that harbor trout and bass.
  • transitive v. To entertain or nourish (a specified thought or feeling): harbor a grudge.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A sheltered expanse of water, adjacent to land, in which ships may dock or anchor, especially for loading and unloading.
  • n. Any place of shelter.
  • v. To provide a harbor or safe place for.
  • v. To take refuge or shelter in a protected expanse of water.
  • v. To hold or persistently entertain in one's thoughts or mind.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A station for rest and entertainment; a place of security and comfort; a refuge; a shelter.
  • n. Specif.: A lodging place; an inn.
  • n. The mansion of a heavenly body.
  • n. A portion of a sea, a lake, or other large body of water, either landlocked or artificially protected so as to be a place of safety for vessels in stormy weather; a port or haven.
  • n. A mixing box for materials.
  • transitive v. To afford lodging to; to entertain as a guest; to shelter; to receive; to give a refuge to; to indulge or cherish (a thought or feeling, esp. an ill thought).
  • intransitive v. To lodge, or abide for a time; to take shelter, as in a harbor.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A place of shelter; a lodging; an inn.
  • n. Specifically The covert of the hart or hind.
  • n. Accommodation; lodging; shelter; refuge.
  • n. A port or haven for ships; a sheltered recess in the coast-line of a sea, gulf, bay, or lake, most frequently at the mouth of a river.
  • n. In glass-making, a chest 6 or 7 feet long which holds the mixed ingredients before they are put into the pot for fusion.
  • To provide a lodging or lodging-place for; lodge.
  • To give shelter to; protect; secure; secrete: as, to harbor a thief.
  • Hence To entertain; cherish; indulge: as, to harbor malice or revenge.
  • To trace home, as a deer to its covert; earth.
  • Synonyms Foster, etc. See cherish.
  • To lodge; dwell.
  • To receive shelter or protection; be entertained; be secreted.
  • To find a harbor; anchor in a harbor, as a ship.
  • n. An obsolete form of arbor, a garden, etc.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. secretly shelter (as of fugitives or criminals)
  • v. maintain (a theory, thoughts, or feelings)
  • n. a place of refuge and comfort and security
  • n. a sheltered port where ships can take on or discharge cargo
  • v. hold back a thought or feeling about
  • v. keep in one's possession; of animals

Etymologies

Middle English herberwe, probably from Old English herebeorg, lodging.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Middle English herberwe, herberge, from Old English herebeorg ‘military quarters, hostelry’, from Proto-Germanic *harjabergō (cf. West Frisian herberch ‘inn’, Dutch herberg ‘id.’, German Herberge ‘id.’), compound of *harjaz ‘army’ and *bergō ‘refuge, shelter’, deverbative of *ƀerʒanan ‘to protect, shelter’ (cf. Old English beorgan). More at harry and bury. (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • "2. Specifically The covert of the hart or hind."
    --Century Dictionary

    March 25, 2011