Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Chiefly British Variant of arbor1.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A shady sitting place, usually in a park or garden, and usually surrounded by climbing shrubs or vines and other vegetation.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. See arbor.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a framework that supports climbing plants

Etymologies

Middle English arbour, from Old French erbier ("field, meadow, kitchen garden"), from erbe ("grass, herb"), from Latin herba ("grass, herb"). The phonetic change to ar- was assisted by association with Latin arbor ("tree"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • They recalled the arbour with clematis, the dresses she had worn, the furniture of her room, the whole of her house.

    Madame Bovary

  • In the rose garden was an arbour smothered in riotous bloom, and in the arbour was a divan, wide and low and voluptuously soft, meet for the repose of an invalid on a languorous afternoon, or indeed any other time.

    The Definite Object A Romance of New York

  • It looked just the same as the other parts of the curtains -- only half hidden among the bushy leaves near the rustic doorway that Lena called the arbour, she found out a queer brown little face that she had not seen before.

    Hoodie

  • Behind is a garden about the size of a good drawing-room, with an arbour, which is a complete sentry-box of privet.

    Our Village

  • Miss Mowcher untied her bonnet, at this passage of her discourse, threw back the strings, and sat down, panting, on a footstool in front of the fire — making a kind of arbour of the dining table, which spread its mahogany shelter above her head.

    David Copperfield

  • In the middle stood a small mound, looking as if it had been made artificially, with a kind of arbour on the top overgrown with some sort of creeper and shut in by trees.

    Chatterbox, 1905.

  • Miss Mowcher untied her bonnet, at this passage of her discourse, threw back the strings, and sat down, panting, on a foot-stool in front of the fire—making a kind of arbour of the dining-table, which spread its mahogany shelter above her head.

    XXII. Some Old Scenes, and Some New People

  • Miss Mowcher untied her bonnet, at this passage of her discourse, threw back the strings, and sat down, panting, on a footstool in front of the fire - making a kind of arbour of the dining table, which spread its mahogany shelter above her head.

    David Copperfield

  • But one of the principal paths led to a kind of arbour, or temple, where long ago palms had been planted in a ring, and had formed

    The Golden Silence

  • For the tonnelle was a kind of arbour – a long covered passage made by trees at each side, whose boughs had been trained to meet and interlace overhead.

    The Tapestry Room: A Child's Romance

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