Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The digestive tract or a portion thereof, especially the intestine or stomach.
  • noun The embryonic digestive tube, consisting of the foregut, the midgut, and the hindgut.
  • noun The bowels or entrails; viscera.
  • noun Innermost emotional or visceral response.
  • noun The inner or essential parts.
  • noun Slang Courage; fortitude.
  • noun Slang A gut course.
  • noun Thin, tough cord made from the intestines of animals, usually sheep, used as strings for musical instruments or as surgical sutures.
  • noun Fibrous material taken from the silk gland of a silkworm before it spins a cocoon, used for fishing tackle.
  • noun A narrow passage or channel.
  • noun The central, lengthwise portion of a playing area.
  • noun The players occupying this space.
  • transitive verb To remove the intestines or entrails of; eviscerate.
  • transitive verb To extract essential or major parts of.
  • transitive verb To destroy the interior of.
  • transitive verb To reduce or destroy the effectiveness of.
  • adjective Arousing or involving basic emotions; visceral.
  • idiom (gut it out) To show pluck and perseverance in the face of opposition or adversity.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To take out the entrails of; disembowel; eviscerate.
  • To plunder of contents; destroy or strip the interior of: as, the burglars gutted the store.
  • noun Either the whole or a distinct division of that part of the alimentary canal of an animal which extends from the stomach to the anus; the intestinal canal, or any part of it; an intestine: as, the large gut; the small gut; the blind gut, or cæcum.
  • noun In the plural, the bowels; the whole mass formed by the natural convolutions of the intestinal canal in the abdomen.
  • noun In biology, the whole intestinal tube, alimentary canal, or digestive tract; the enteric tube, from mouth to anus. See enteron, stomodæum, proctodæum.
  • noun The whole digestive system; the viscera; the entrails in general: commonly in the plural.
  • noun The substance forming the case of the intestine; intestinal tissue or fiber: as, sheep's gut; calf-gut.
  • noun A preparation of the intestines of an animal used for various purposes, as for the strings of a violin, or, in angling, for the snood or leader to which the hook or lure is attached.
  • noun A narrow passage; particularly, a narrow channel of water; a strait; a long narrow inlet.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A narrow passage of water.
  • noun An intenstine; a bowel; the whole alimentary canal; the enteron; (pl.) bowels; entrails.
  • noun One of the prepared entrails of an animal, esp. of a sheep, used for various purposes. See Catgut.
  • noun The sac of silk taken from a silkworm (when ready to spin its cocoon), for the purpose of drawing it out into a thread. This, when dry, is exceedingly strong, and is used as the snood of a fish line.
  • noun See CÆcum, n. (b).
  • transitive verb To take out the bowels from; to eviscerate.
  • transitive verb To plunder of contents; to destroy or remove the interior or contents of.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The alimentary canal, especially the intestine.
  • noun informal The abdomen of a person, especially one that is enlarged
  • noun uncountable The intestines of an animal used to make strings of a tennis racket or violin, etc.
  • noun A person's emotional, visceral self.
  • noun this sense?) Any small internal organs.
  • noun in the plural The essential, core parts.
  • noun in the plural Ability and will to face up to adversity or unpleasantness.
  • noun informal A gut course
  • verb transitive To eviscerate.
  • verb transitive To remove or destroy the most important parts of.
  • adjective Made of gut, e.g., a violin with gut strings
  • adjective Instinctive, e.g., a gut reaction

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[From Middle English guttes, entrails, from Old English guttas; see gheu- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English gut, gutte, gotte, from Old English gutt (usually in plural guttas ("guts, entrails")), from Proto-Germanic *gut-, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰeud- (“to pour”). Related to English gote ("drain"), Old English ġēotan ("to pour"). More at gote, yote.

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