Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The esophagus.
  • noun The throat.
  • noun Zoology An invagination into the cytoplasm of certain ciliates, used for food intake.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To cut or make gullets in: as, to gullet a saw.
  • noun The passage in the neck of an animal by which food and drink pass from the mouth to the stomach; the throat; technically, in anatomy, the esophagus.
  • noun Something resembling the throat in shape, position, or functions.
  • noun A preparatory cut or channel in excavations, of sufficient width to admit of the passage of wagons.
  • noun A peculiar concave cut in the teeth of some saw-blades. See gullet-saw.
  • noun A gore, as in a skirt.
  • noun Part of a hood or cowl.
  • noun A piece of armor for the throat or upper part of the body.
  • noun The lower end of a horse-collar about which pass the choke-strap and breast-strap.
  • noun The arch of a bridge.
  • noun A parcel or lot.
  • noun A fish, the pike.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Anat.) The tube by which food and drink are carried from the pharynx to the stomach; the esophagus.
  • noun Something shaped like the food passage, or performing similar functions.
  • noun A channel for water.
  • noun (Engin.) A preparatory cut or channel in excavations, of sufficient width for the passage of earth wagons.
  • noun A concave cut made in the teeth of some saw blades.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The throat or esophagus.
  • noun cytology The cytopharynx of a ciliate, through which food is ingested.
  • noun The space between the teeth of a saw blade.
  • noun A channel for water.
  • noun A preparatory cut or channel in excavations, of sufficient width for the passage of earth wagons.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the passage between the pharynx and the stomach

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English golet, from Old French goulet, from goule, throat, from Latin gula.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old English golet, Old French goulet, from Latin gula.

Examples

Comments

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  • About us gobblers fork spiced beans down their gullets.

    Joyce, Ulysses, 3

    December 30, 2006