Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Not deliberate.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • His wings moved in slow, undeliberate motions, like the passage of clouds across the sky.

    City of Glass

  • Though the river may flow on forever, oblivious to the men that come and go along its shores, yet the passing generations may transform this undeliberate flowing into the power that yields them clothing, machinery, and transportation.

    Human Traits and their Social Significance

  • And apart from the involuntary and undeliberate adoption of Roman standards, which, living isolated from

    Josephus

  • One with a strong stomach and a hard head may be able to tolerate much of the unconscious and undeliberate cruelty and torture of the world that is perpetrated in hot blood and stupidity.

    Foreword

  • And apart from the involuntary and undeliberate adoption of Roman standards, which, living isolated from Jewish life in Rome, he could not escape, he had in writing, and no doubt in conversation, deliberately and consciously to assume the deepest-seated of the Roman prejudices towards his own people.

    Josephus

  • The vision passed as swiftly as it came, dropping back again into the submerged region of his consciousness; but he never forgot it, and the whole of his life thereafter became a sort of natural though undeliberate preparation for the fulfilment of the great duty when the time should be ripe.

    Four Weird Tales

  • A rough movement, a too undeliberate speech, and the absurdity of the thing might be given away.

    The Story of My Life

  • But his companion had already vanished in the thicket with the undeliberate and impulsive act of an animal.

    A Sappho of Green Springs

  • In clear view and with all undeliberate speed, we developed a system that rewards procedures over primary care.

    theadvertiser.com -

  • Nor does he stick to it long when he says that "instinct is a kind of organised memory," for two pages later he says that memory, to be memory at all, must be tolerably conscious or deliberate; he, therefore (vol.i. p. 447), denies that there can be such a thing as unconscious memory; but without this it is impossible for us to see instinct as the "kind of organised memory" which he has just been calling it, inasmuch as instinct is notably undeliberate and unreflecting.

    Luck or Cunning?

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