Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • interjection Used to express annoyance, impatience, or mild reproof.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To project.
  • noun A hassock; a footstool.
  • noun A piece of work; a job.
  • To do work by the tut or tote; work by the piece.
  • To express impatience, contempt, or the like by the interjection tut.
  • An exclamation used to check or rebuke, or to express impatience or contempt. It is synonymous with tush.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • interjection Be still; hush; -- an exclamation used for checking or rebuking.
  • noun An imperial ensign consisting of a golden globe with a cross on it.
  • noun Obs. or Prov. Eng. A hassock.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • interjection See tut tut
  • verb To make a tut tut sound of disapproval.
  • noun Internet, slang A tutorial.
  • noun An imperial ensign consisting of a golden globe with a cross on it.
  • noun UK, obsolete, dialect A hassock.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb utter `tsk,' `tut,' or `tut-tut,' as in disapproval

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Imitative.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Shortening of tutorial.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Compare Swedish tut ("a point, pipe, tube"), Danish tut ("a cornet").

Examples

  • We thought their language more harsh than that of the islanders in the South Sea, and they were continually repeating the word _chercau_, which we imagined to be a term expressing admiration, by the manner in which it was uttered: They also cried out, when they saw any thing new, _Cher, tut, tut, tut, tut_! which probably had a similar signification.

    A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels — Volume 13

  • America's Best Christian, Mrs. Betty Bowers, calls out Mormons and schools all Americans on the unconstitutional craze of doling out civil rights by popular vote: Hark! From sea to rising sea, crafty Christians are busy putting the "tut" -- and "con" -- back in

    WN.com - Business News

  • Mormons and schools all Americans on the unconstitutional craze of doling out civil rights by popular vote: Hark! From sea to rising sea, crafty Christians are busy putting the "tut" -- and "con" -- back in "Constitution"!

    WN.com - Business News

  • “Pok,” she then complained and duly launched a glottal raft of “arcs...” defined as tut, tut, tuts!

    Puck, You, And Your Vocabulary

  • I know a lot of time and effort goes into producing any tut, which is why I feel bad for mentioning anything negative.

    Pinotblogger: the Capozzi Winery blog

  • Automatically Georgina responded to that "tut" as if it were the old challenge of the powder horn.

    Georgina of the Rainbows

  • This enquiry will point a few fingers and 'tut' a little, but the major players will walk free and get on with their lives without a second thought for the sons, brothers, fathers and friends they murdered.

    Army Rumour Service

  • I'd mutter a loud "tut" as I passed; his dog would never darken our shingle from May to September again.

    The Guardian World News

  • I'd mutter a loud "tut" as I passed; his dog would never darken our shingle from May to September again.

    The Guardian World News

  • I'd mutter a loud "tut" as I passed; his dog would never darken our shingle from May to September again.

    The Guardian World News

Comments

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  • Today I went past a small ethnic restaurant called "King Tut's Hut". I would always pronounced this "Toot", like the beginning of Tutankhamen. But I wondered whether, in combination with "Hut", the expectation was that we'd pronounce the name to rhyme with the following word. Then, to complicate matters, there was a slogan painted on the window: "Toot and come in." Hmm.

    March 22, 2009

  • I'm sure Batman and Robin referred to their baddie as King Tut rhyming with wing nut.

    March 22, 2009

  • "General term applied to any fancied supernatural being, of which there were an abundance in the British Isles. ... The Latin-esque tutivillus, from which tut can be traced, was also used by writers to bring forth images of a demon." -Forgotten English

    January 30, 2012