Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • intransitive verb To hit or push against with the head or horns; ram.
  • intransitive verb To hit or push something with the head or horns.
  • intransitive verb To project forward or out.
  • noun A push or blow with the head or horns.
  • noun A large cask.
  • noun A unit of volume equal to two hogsheads, usually the equivalent of 126 US gallons (about 477 liters).
  • noun The larger or thicker end of an object.
  • noun An unburned end, as of a cigarette.
  • noun Informal A cigarette.
  • noun A short or broken remnant; a stub.
  • noun Informal The buttocks; the rear end.
  • adverb Slang Very. Used as an intensive.
  • noun One that serves as an object of ridicule or contempt.
  • noun A target, as in archery or riflery.
  • noun A target range.
  • noun An obstacle behind a target for stopping the shot.
  • noun An embankment or hollow used as a blind by hunters of wildfowl.
  • noun Archaic A goal.
  • noun Obsolete A bound; a limit.
  • transitive & intransitive verb To join or be joined end to end; abut.
  • noun A butt joint.
  • noun A butt hinge.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun See but.
  • noun A push or thrust given by the head of an animal: as, the butt of a ram.
  • noun A thrust in fencing.
  • noun In archery, the end of an arrow which is held against the bowstring in shooting: opposed to point.
  • noun A shelter or concealment, built of blocks of peat or turf, for the gunner in grouse-driving on English and Scotch moors. Also called a battery.
  • noun In the tobacco trade, a box 12 inches square, holding from 15 to 50 pounds.
  • noun plural The ends or ‘cuttings’ of jute rejected by the manufacturer of cloth or bagging. They are used in making coarse kinds of paper.
  • To strike by thrusting, as with the end of a beam or heavy stick, or with the horns, tusks, or head, as an ox, a boar, or a ram; strike with the head.
  • To strike anything by thrusting the head against it, as an ox or a ram; have a habit of striking in this manner.
  • To join at the end or outward extremity; abut; be contiguous.
  • Specifically, in ship-building, to abut end to end; fit together end to end, as two planks.
  • Also spelled but.
  • noun A leathern bottle or flask; a bucket: in this sense only in Middle English, usually spelled bit or bitt.
  • noun A large cask, especially one to contain wine.
  • noun A measure of wine equal to 126 United States (that is, old wine) gallons; a pipe.
  • noun A beehive.
  • noun A cart.
  • To lay down bounds or limits for.
  • To cut off the ends of, as boards, in order to make square ends or to remove faulty portions.
  • To abut. See butt, verb, II., 2, 3.
  • Also spelled but.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English butten, from Old French bouter, to strike, of Germanic origin; see bhau- in Indo-European roots.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, from Old French boute, from Late Latin *buttia, variant of buttis.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English butte, from Old French but, end, of Germanic origin.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English butte, target, from Old French, from but, goal, end, target; see butt.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English butten, from Anglo-Norman butter (variant of Old French bouter; see butt) and from but, end; see butt.]

Examples

Comments

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  • for a cigarette, my old man says cigabutt.

    March 14, 2007

  • A unit of volume equal to two hogsheads or 126 gallons.

    November 7, 2007

  • Ah yes, that old legend about George, duke of Clarence being drowned in a butt of malmsey wine in the Tower of London... It does seem that 126 gallons would be enough to do the trick.

    November 7, 2007

  • And I cannot lie.

    November 7, 2007

  • Clearly this word most commonly refers to the "thick end of the handle," and not, as I mistakenly believed, a person's posterior. Thank you, WordNet!

    November 8, 2007

  • I randomed this, honestly! *facepalm*

    August 7, 2008

  • I especially like WeirdNET's fourth and eighth definitions. WTF?

    August 7, 2008

  • 'equipment needed to participate in a particular sport' was the one that mystified me. I hope Chinese authorities have ensured an adequate supply of butts for the Olympic Games.

    August 7, 2008

  • Actually... You need butts (of a sort) to participate in archery, which is an Olympic sport. *is a bit stunned that bilby's bizarre assertion is somewhat accurate*

    And what's with that last definition? Oh Weirdnet. You're so weird.

    August 7, 2008

  • Yes, definition #4 is exquisite: "Something determined in relation to something that includes it." Oh, WeirdNet. You're always so . . . precise.

    August 7, 2008