Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Of, relating to, or involving the laity.
  • adjective Not of or belonging to a particular profession; nonprofessional.
  • noun A narrative poem, such as one sung by medieval minstrels; a ballad.
  • noun A song; a tune.
  • intransitive verb To cause to lie down.
  • intransitive verb To place in or bring to a particular position.
  • intransitive verb To bury.
  • intransitive verb To cause to be in a particular condition.
  • intransitive verb To put or set down.
  • intransitive verb To produce and deposit.
  • intransitive verb To cause to subside; calm or allay.
  • intransitive verb To put up to or against something.
  • intransitive verb To put forward as a reproach or an accusation.
  • intransitive verb To put or set in order or readiness for use.
  • intransitive verb To devise; contrive.
  • intransitive verb To spread over a surface.
  • intransitive verb To place or give (importance).
  • intransitive verb To impose as a burden or punishment.
  • intransitive verb To present for examination.
  • intransitive verb To put forward as a demand or an assertion.
  • intransitive verb Games To place (a bet); wager.
  • intransitive verb To aim (a gun or cannon).
  • intransitive verb To place together (strands) to be twisted into rope.
  • intransitive verb To make in this manner.
  • intransitive verb Vulgar Slang To have sexual intercourse with.
  • intransitive verb To produce and deposit eggs.
  • intransitive verb To bet; wager.
  • intransitive verb Nonstandard To lie.
  • intransitive verb Nautical To put oneself into the position indicated.
  • noun The direction the strands of a rope or cable are twisted in.
  • noun The amount of such twist.
  • noun The state of one that lays eggs.
  • noun Sexual intercourse.
  • noun A partner in sexual intercourse.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, from Old French lai, from Late Latin lāicus, from Greek lāikos, of the people, from lāos, the people.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, from Old French lai.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English leien, from Old English lecgan; see legh- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old French lai

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English layen, leggen, from Old English lecgan ("to lay"), from Proto-Germanic *lagjanan (“to lay”), causative form of Proto-Germanic *ligjanan, *legjanan (“to lie, recline”), from Proto-Indo-European *legʰ- (“to lie, recline”). Cognate with Dutch leggen ("to lay"), German legen ("to lay"), Swedish lägga ("to lay"), Icelandic leggja ("to lay"), Albanian lag ("troop, band, war encampment").

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English laie, lawe, from Old English lagu ("sea, flood, water, ocean"), from Proto-Germanic *laguz (“water, sea”), from Proto-Indo-European *lakw- (“water, body of water, lake”). Cognate with Icelandic lögur ("liquid, fluid, lake"), Latin lacus ("lake, hollow, hole").

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From the verb.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English lay, from Old French lai ("song, lyric, poem"), from Frankish *laik, *laih ("play, melody, song"), from Proto-Germanic *laikaz, *laikiz (“jump, play, dance, hymn”), from Proto-Indo-European *loig-, *(e)laiǵ- (“to jump, spring, play”). Akin to Old High German leih ("a play, skit, melody, song"), Middle High German leich ("piece of music, epic song played on a harp"), Old English lācan ("to move quickly, fence, sing"). See lake.

Examples

Comments

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  • lay - lea - leed: land left fallow

    March 26, 2009