Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To relate to a particular cause or source; attribute the fault or responsibility to: imputed the rocket failure to a faulty gasket; kindly imputed my clumsiness to inexperience.
  • transitive v. To assign as a characteristic; credit: the gracefulness so often imputed to cats. See Synonyms at attribute.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To reckon as pertaining or attributable; to charge; to ascribe; to attribute; to set to the account of; to charge to one as the author, responsible originator, or possessor; -- generally in a bad sense.
  • v. To ascribe (sin or righteousness) to someone by substitution.
  • v. To take account of; to consider; to regard.
  • v. To attribute or credit to.
  • v. To attribute (responsibility or fault) to a cause or source.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To charge; to ascribe; to attribute; to set to the account of; to charge to one as the author, responsible originator, or possessor; -- generally in a bad sense.
  • transitive v. To adjudge as one's own (the sin or righteousness) of another.
  • transitive v. To take account of; to consider; to regard.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To charge; attribute; ascribe; reckon as pertaining or attributable.
  • To reckon as chargeable or accusable; charge; tax; accuse.
  • To attribute vicariously; ascribe as derived from another: used especially in theology. See doctrine of imputation, under imputation.
  • To take account of; reckon; regard; consider.
  • Synonyms Attribute, Ascribe, Refer, etc. See attribute.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. attribute (responsibility or fault) to a cause or source
  • v. attribute or credit to

Etymologies

Middle English imputen, from Old French emputer, from Latin imputāre : in-, in; + putāre, to settle an account.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
French imputer, Latin imputare ("to bring into the reckoning, charge, impute"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Though I don't use the word impute too often its etymology is in some ways consistent with the answer to David's question.

    history

  • Jumping back to Samuel Johnson's word impute, its meaning was to subtract from that same metaphorical balance sheet. about podictionary

    history

  • And when she gets in front of a judge that judge will "impute" an income to you even if you are unemployed and insist that you continue to support her in the style to which she is accustomed.

    Want a Husband? Try a Eur-Male Pass

  • We make or "impute" these mental abstractions all the time.

    The Mechanism of Karma: The Mahayana Presentation, Except for Gelug Prasangika ��� Session Three: The Aftermath of Karma

  • Based on that sequence, as a manner of speaking, we say or "impute" that there is a habit of drinking tea.

    Basic Questions on Karma and Rebirth

  • If it be imputed by His gracious estimation for righteousness, (which must be asserted,) and if it be imputed by His nongracious estimation; then it is apparent, in this confusion of these two axioms, that the word "impute" must be understood ambiguously, and that it has two meanings.

    The Works of James Arminius, Vol. 1

  • If they say, that the word "impute" is received in a different acceptation, let them prove their assertion by an example; and when they have given proof of this, (which will be a work of great difficulty to them,) they will have effected nothing.

    The Works of James Arminius, Vol. 1

  • Marco Lombardo, one of these, points out to Dante the error of such as impute our actions to necessity; explains to him that man is endued with free will; and shows that much of human depravity results from the undue mixture of spiritual and temporal authority in rulers.

    Purgatory. Canto XVI

  • Say people "impute" 'em, and show thou art pension'd;

    Gossip in a Library

  • In 2001, the ONS has admitted that it had to "impute" information for 6.1 per cent of households who failed to fill in the forms - more than 1. 5million families.

    Telegraph.co.uk: news, business, sport, the Daily Telegraph newspaper, Sunday Telegraph

Comments

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  • Also to accuse.

    July 20, 2008