Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • transitive verb To decrease the emphasis on; minimize the importance of.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb transitive To remove or reduce the emphasis from something; to make something less important; to play down.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb reduce the emphasis

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Does this day of Holocaust remembrance seek to de-emphasize the particular importance of the Nazi dream of destroying the Jewish people?

    Brad Hirschfield: Holocaust Remembrance: Who Owns Memory?

  • I've heard it said that modern libraries too often de-emphasize books in favor of electronic material.

    Libraries

  • Based on the study, Smart planned to de-emphasize interdiction to concentrate on the new target systems: “[The aim is to] bring about defeat of the enemy as expeditiously as possible [rather than] allowing him to languish in comparative quiescence while we expand our efforts beating up supply routes.”

    Between War and Peace

  • Does this day of Holocaust remembrance seek to de-emphasize the particular importance of the Nazi dream of destroying the Jewish people?

    Brad Hirschfield: Holocaust Remembrance: Who Owns Memory?

  • Economist Carmen Reinhart of the Peterson Institute for International Economics in Washington predicts a downgrade will accelerate efforts by governments on both sides of the Atlantic to de-emphasize rating-firm opinions, a particularly convenient move at a time when governments are borrowing so heavily.

    Would a Credit Downgrade Matter?

  • Now some Republicans wondered if the party should de-emphasize its antislavery values in an effort to attract voters.

    Before he became the national icon, Lincoln was a shrewd candidate

  • And wired to zero in on any apparent bad news in a larger stream of information (e.g., fixing on a casual aside from a family member or co-worker), to tune out or de-emphasize reassuring good news, and to keep thinking about the one thing that was negative in a day in which a hundred small things happened, ninety-nine of which were neutral or positive.

    Rick Hanson, Ph.D.: Confronting the Negativity Bias

  • And wired to zero in on any apparent bad news in a larger stream of information (e.g., fixing on a casual aside from a family member or co-worker), to tune out or de-emphasize reassuring good news, and to keep thinking about the one thing that was negative in a day in which a hundred small things happened, ninety-nine of which were neutral or positive.

    Rick Hanson, Ph.D.: Confronting the Negativity Bias

  • And wired to zero in on any apparent bad news in a larger stream of information (e.g., fixing on a casual aside from a family member or co-worker), to tune out or de-emphasize reassuring good news, and to keep thinking about the one thing that was negative in a day in which a hundred small things happened, ninety-nine of which were neutral or positive.

    Rick Hanson, Ph.D.: Confronting the Negativity Bias

  • Because the Billboard Top 25 tends to "really de-emphasize the last half of the year," Mr. Roseman based the 2011 "United States of Pop" recording, also titled "World Goes Boom," on weekly charts, to account for late-breaking hits.

    Messages in 2011's Music

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