Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • intransitive verb To make a piece of needlework by looping thread with a hooked needle.
  • intransitive verb To make by looping thread with a hooked needle.
  • noun Needlework made by looping thread with a hooked needle.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To produce a close or open fabric by hooking a thread of worsted, linen, silk, etc., into meshes with a crochet-needle.
  • To make in the style of work called crochet: as, to crochet a shawl; crocheted edging.
  • noun A fold of enamel directed forward from the anterior edge of the median cross-crest (metaloph) in such a tooth as the molar of a rhinoceros. See cut under tooth.
  • noun A kind of knitting by means of a needle with a hook at one end.
  • noun An old hagbut or hand-cannon. Wilhelm, Mil. Dict.
  • noun In fortification, an indentation in the glacis, opposite a traverse, continuing the covered way around the traverse.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • verb To knit with a crochet needle or hook.
  • noun A kind of knitting done by means of a hooked needle, with worsted, silk, or cotton; crochet work. Commonly used adjectively.
  • noun a small hook, or a hooked needle (often of bone), used in crochet work.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Needlework made by looping thread with a hooked needle.
  • verb to make (a piece of) needlework using a hooked needle, to make interlocking loops of thread.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun needlework done by interlocking looped stitches with a hooked needle
  • verb create by looping or crocheting
  • verb make a piece of needlework by interlocking and looping thread with a hooked needle

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[French crocheter, from Old French crochet, hook, diminutive of croche, feminine of croc, of Germanic origin.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From French crochet, from Middle French crochet, from Old French crochet, crokét ("curved instrument, hook"), diminutive of Old French croc ("hook"), from Old Frankish *krōk ("hook") or from Old Norse krókr ("hook, bend, bight"), both from Proto-Germanic *krōkaz (“hook”), from Proto-Indo-European *gerg- (“tracery, basket, twist”). Cognate with Middle Dutch croec, crōc ("curl"), Middle English crōc ("crook, hook"). More at crook, crooked.

Examples

Comments

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  • I pronounced that word "crotch-ett" for the longest time, lol... I like it that way better... :P

    March 12, 2009

  • Good idea. ;o}

    March 12, 2009

  • I still say it that way in my head. I have to be careful if using the word in conversation.

    March 12, 2009

  • Sounds like something my mom would say for fun. :-)

    March 12, 2009