Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To temper by adjusting relative quantities, or blending qualities.
  • v. To mitigate, assuage.
  • v. To regulate, arrange, organise.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To reduce, modify, or moderate, by mixture; to temper; to regulate, as temperature.
  • transitive v. To soften, mollify, or moderate; to soothe; to temper.
  • transitive v. To mix in just proportion; to regulate.
  • transitive v. To accommodate; to make suitable; to adapt.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To reduce, modify, or moderate by mixture: as, to attemper spirits by diluting them with water.
  • To soften, mollify, or moderate: as, to attemper justice with clemency.
  • To mix in just proportion; regulate.
  • To accommodate; fit or make suitable.
  • [In all its uses nearly obsolete, temper being generally used.]

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. modify the temperature of

Etymologies

From Old French atemprer (French attremper), from Latin attemperare. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • And this attribute seems to attemper the love [which God entertains] for the good of justice.

    The Works of James Arminius, Vol. 2

  • Gerard tells us: "The flowers are of a very sweet smell, as is the rest of the herb, which, being made up into garlands or bundles, and hanged up in houses, in the heat of summer, doth very well attemper the air, cool and make fresh the place, to the delight and comfort of such as are therein."

    Herbal Simples Approved for Modern Uses of Cure

  • In foreign relations we have to attemper our power to the less happy condition of other Republics in America and to place ourselves in the calmness and conscious dignity of right by the side of the greatest and wealthiest of the Empires of Europe.

    State of the Union Address (1790-2001)

  • Then we fast in March for to attemper and depress the blood of concupiscence disordinate, for sanguine of his nature is full of fleshly concupiscence.

    The Golden Legend, vol. 1

  • To this then that this fasting may attemper in us four times in the year, at each time we fast three days, to the end that the number of four may be reported to the body, and the number of three to the soul.

    The Golden Legend, vol. 1

  • And so great a multitude of christian people were slain then, that the people of Rome brake up his palace and cried and moved sedition against him, saying: Cæsar, amend thy manners and attemper thy commandments, for these be our people that thou destroyest, and defend the empire of Rome.

    The Golden Legend, vol. 4

  • And she answered: Son, attemper thy wrath and tarry a little, I have a true servant and a noble fighter against the vices, which shall run over all and vanquish the world, and subdue them under thy signory, and I shall give to them another servant into his help that shall fight as he doth.

    The Golden Legend, vol. 4

  • Then I asked if there were any remedy that might attemper the wrath of our Lord.

    The Golden Legend, vol. 6

  • And when his brethren constrained him to take a medicine for his eyes, and the surgeon held a burning iron in his hand, the blessed Francis said: My brother fire, be thou to me in this hour debonair and curable: I pray to our Lord that made thee, that thou attemper my heat.

    The Golden Legend, vol. 5

  • At ye upper End are two Cocks to let in one hott, ye other Cold water to attemper it as persons please – the Windows are all private Glass.

    Through England on a Side Saddle in the Time of William and Mary

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