Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A formal statement of religious belief; a confession of faith.
  • noun A system of belief, principles, or opinions.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A statement of belief on any subject, religious, political, scientific, or other; especially, a formal statement of religious belief; a “form of words, setting forth with authority certain articles of belief which are regarded by the framers as necessary for salvation, or at least for the well-being of the Christian Church” (Schaff, The Creeds of Christendom, I. i.).
  • noun What is believed; accepted doctrine; especially, religious doctrine.
  • To credit; believe.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • transitive verb obsolete To believe; to credit.
  • noun A definite summary of what is believed; esp., a summary of the articles of Christian faith; a confession of faith for public use; esp., one which is brief and comprehensive.
  • noun Any summary of principles or opinions professed or adhered to.
  • noun See under Apostle, Athanasian, Nicene.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun That which is believed; accepted doctrine, especially religious; a particular set of beliefs; any summary of principles or opinions professed or adhered to.
  • noun A reading or statement of belief that summarizes the faith it represents; a definite summary of what is believed; a confession of faith for public use; esp., one which is brief and comprehensive.
  • noun rare The fact of believing; belief, faith.
  • verb To believe; to credit.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun any system of principles or beliefs
  • noun the written body of teachings of a religious group that are generally accepted by that group

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English crede, from Old English crēda, from Latin crēdō, I believe; see credo.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old English credo, crede, Old English creda, from Latin credo ("I believe"), from credere ("to believe"); akin to Old Irish cretim ("I believe"), and Sanskrit रद्दध्मि (raddadhmi); crat ("trust") + dh ("to put").

Examples

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