Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The act of affirming or the state of being affirmed; assertion.
  • noun Something declared to be true; a positive statement or judgment.
  • noun Law The assertion that the testimony one gives is true and equivalent to that which would be given while under oath.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The assertion that something is, or is true; the assignment of a certain character to an object: opposed to denial or negation.
  • noun That which is affirmed; a proposition that is declared to be true; averment; assertion.
  • noun Confirmation; ratification; establishment of something of prior origin.
  • noun In law, the solemn declaration made by Quakers, Moravians, or others conscientiously opposed to taking oaths, in cases where an oath is generally required.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun Confirmation of anything established; ratification.
  • noun The act of affirming or asserting as true; assertion; -- opposed to negation or denial.
  • noun That which is asserted; an assertion; a positive statement; an averment.
  • noun (Law) A solemn declaration made under the penalties of perjury, by persons who conscientiously decline taking an oath, which declaration is in law equivalent to an oath.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A declaration that something is true; an oath.
  • noun A form of self-forced meditation or repetition; autosuggestion.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun (religion) a solemn declaration that serves the same purpose as an oath (if an oath is objectionable to the person on religious or ethical grounds)
  • noun the act of affirming or asserting or stating something
  • noun a statement asserting the existence or the truth of something
  • noun a judgment by a higher court that the judgment of a lower court was correct and should stand

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old French afermacion, from Latin affirmare ("to assert").

Examples

  • As in affirmation; or even in “To sleep, perchance to dream.”

    Perils of pop philosophy

  • First of all the Inquisition was historically after the caliphate, but the affirmation is also wrong in its contents.

    Islam

  • First of all the Inquisition was historically after the caliphate, but the affirmation is also wrong in its contents.

    Interreligious Dialogue

  • One reason for this affirmation is that it was believed that only a Christian would understand that government office holder is responsible to God.

    Think Progress » Portugal’s parliament approves same-sex marriage.

  • One reason for this affirmation is that it was believed that only a Christian would understand that government office holder is responsible to God.

    Think Progress » Portugal’s parliament approves same-sex marriage.

  • Nearly every essay contained a nugget of truth so close to my own experience that I found myself nodding in affirmation, or shaking my head in wonderment.

    It’s Only Me

  • Nearly every essay contained a nugget of truth so close to my own experience that I found myself nodding in affirmation, or shaking my head in wonderment.

    2008 April « Becca’s Byline

  • Nearly every essay contained a nugget of truth so close to my own experience that I found myself nodding in affirmation, or shaking my head in wonderment.

    It’s Only Me

  • I scruple a bit to put it quite this way, but it is astonishing sometimes to think what an extraordinary opportunity the 9/11 attacks presented — an opportunity to rally not just the country but the whole of a sympathetic liberal West (and anyone else who was game) in affirmation of the shared values that distinguish us from fanatical theocrats: pluralism, freedom of speech, secular government, democracy, reason, the rule of law.

    All Quiet on the Western Front

  • “I scruple a bit to put it quite this way, but it is astonishing sometimes to think what an extraordinary opportunity the 9/11 attacks presented — an opportunity to rally not just the country but the whole of a sympathetic liberal West (and anyone else who was game) in affirmation of the shared values that distinguish us from fanatical theocrats: pluralism, freedom of speech, secular government, democracy, reason, the rule of law”

    All Quiet on the Western Front

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