predestination love

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from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The act of predestining or the condition of being predestined.
  • n. Theology The doctrine that God has foreordained all things, especially that God has elected certain souls to eternal salvation.
  • n. Theology The divine decree foreordaining all souls to either salvation or damnation.
  • n. Theology The act of God foreordaining all things gone before and to come.
  • n. Destiny; fate.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The doctrine that everything has been foreordained by a God, especially that certain people have been elected for salvation, and sometimes also that others are destined for reprobation.
  • n. Destiny or fate.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The act of predestinating.
  • n. The purpose of Good from eternity respecting all events; especially, the preordination of men to everlasting happiness or misery. See Calvinism.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The act of predestinating, or the state of being predestinated; fate; specifically, in theology, the decree or purpose of God, by which he has from eternity immutably determined whatever comes to pass; in a more restricted sense, the decree by which men are destined to everlasting happiness or misery; in the most restricted sense, predestination to eternal life, or election (the correlative doctrine that God has predestined some to everlasting death is termed reprobation). See predestinate, v. t.
  • n. Synonyms Foreordination, predetermination.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. (theology) being determined in advance; especially the doctrine (usually associated with Calvin) that God has foreordained every event throughout eternity (including the final salvation of mankind)
  • n. previous determination as if by destiny or fate


Middle English, from Old French predestination, from Late Latin praedestinatio. (Wiktionary)



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  • Those who ponder the structure of finite reality and come to the conclusion of "predestination" do not understand the nature of growth.

    --Jan Cox

    August 19, 2007