transubstantiation love

transubstantiation

Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Conversion of one substance into another.
  • n. In many Christian churches, the doctrine holding that the bread and wine of the Eucharist are transformed into the body and blood of Jesus, although their appearances remain the same.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Conversion of one substance into another.
  • n. The doctrine holding that the bread and wine of the Eucharist are transformed into the body and blood of Jesus.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A change into another substance.
  • n. The doctrine held by Roman Catholics, that the bread and wine in the Mass is converted into the body and blood of Christ; -- distinguished from consubstantiation, and impanation.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A change of one substance into another; specifically, in theology, the conversion, in the consecration of the elements of the eucharist, of the whole substance of the bread into the body, and of the whole substance of the wine into the blood, of Christ, only the appearances of the bread and wine remaining. This is the doctrine of the Roman Catholic Church.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an act that changes the form or character or substance of something
  • n. the Roman Catholic doctrine that the whole substance of the bread and the wine changes into the substance of the body and blood of Christ when consecrated in the Eucharist

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

Comments

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  • For some reasons this word was in my mind today. It's passing iroquoisy to read it on the main page now.

    August 23, 2008

  • cf. consubtantiation in the Lutheran and Anglican/Episcopal religions, and consider the Low Church vs. High Church leanings with respect to the topic.

    August 23, 2008

  • That makes a lot more sense. I thought that somehow transubstantiation contributed to your naturalism, and not towards your departure from mysticism.

    July 31, 2007

  • As a Roman Catholic schoolchild, transubstantiation was the dogma that ignited my awareness of how mystical that theology was. Considering how diligently my parents and teachers were striving to foster my reason, logic, and scientific thought, this awareness inevitably led to contemplation and eventually my subscription to naturalism.

    July 30, 2007

  • Funny, I had the opposite reaction: "Aha, makes sense to me."

    July 29, 2007

  • Would you care to elaborate? That is a pretty strange statement.

    July 29, 2007

  • This concept is largely responsible for my naturalist philosophy.

    July 29, 2007