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consubstantiation

Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The doctrine, held by some Christian churches, that the substance of the body and blood of Jesus coexists with the substance of the bread and wine in the Eucharist.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The doctrine that the body and blood of Christ coexist in and with the elements of the eucharist, although the latter retain their nature as bread and wine: opposed to the Roman Catholic doctrine of transubstantiation.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun An identity or union of substance.
  • noun (Theol.) The actual, substantial presence of the body of Christ with the bread and wine of the sacrament of the Lord's Supper; impanation; -- opposed to transubstantiation.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun An identity or union of substance.
  • noun Christianity The actual, substantial presence of the body of Christ with the bread and wine of the sacrament of the Lord's Supper; impanation, as opposed to transubstantiation.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the doctrine of the High Anglican Church that after the consecration of the Eucharist the substance of the body and blood of Christ coexists with the substance of the consecrated bread and wine

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And while Lutherans do not like the term consubstantiation because it is so closely associated with the Catholic doctrine of transubstantiation, Luther did insist on the real and substantial presence of Christ in the Lord's Supper.

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  • And while Lutherans do not like the term consubstantiation because it is so closely associated with the Catholic doctrine of transubstantiation, Luther did insist on the real and substantial presence of Christ in the Lord's Supper.

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  • The Lutherans maintained what they called consubstantiation, that Christ was _with_ and _in_ the bread and wine, as fire is in a hot iron, to borrow the metaphor of Luther himself.

    A Political and Social History of Modern Europe V.1.

  • The word consubstantiation, however, is not found in the Lutheran symbols, and is rejected by Lutheran theologians if used in the sense of impanation. "

    American Lutheranism Volume 2: The United Lutheran Church (General Synod, General Council, United Synod in the South)

  • Here Calvin is opposing Lutheran consubstantiation, which is far closer to the truth than his view.

    Biblical Evidence for Catholicism

  • This is known as consubstantiation, signifying that Christ's body and blood are present in, under, and through the elements of bread and wine.

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  • This is known as consubstantiation, signifying that Christ's body and blood are present in, under, and through the elements of bread and wine.

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  • Centuries later during the Counter-Reformation, the feast became still more important as an occasion to reassert the Tridentine dogma of transubstantiation against the various alternatives proposed by the Reformers, from "consubstantiation" to outright denial of the Real Presence in favor of seeing the Eucharist as a memorial alone.

    The ambiguity of Corpus Christi

  • Centuries later during the Counter-Reformation, the feast became still more important as an occasion to reassert the Tridentine dogma of transubstantiation against the various alternatives proposed by the Reformers, from "consubstantiation" to outright denial of the Real Presence in favor of seeing the Eucharist as a memorial alone.

    Archive 2007-06-01

  • Some of the later doctors of the church, Durand and Occam, opposed this theory, though they proposed a nearly allied one, called "consubstantiation," that the body and blood are present with the bread and wine.

    The Age of the Reformation

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