Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The act of relaxing or the state of being relaxed.
  • noun Refreshment of body or mind; recreation.
  • noun A loosening or slackening.
  • noun A reduction in strictness or severity.
  • noun Physiology The lengthening of inactive muscle or muscle fibers.
  • noun Physics The return or adjustment of a system to equilibrium following displacement or abrupt change.
  • noun Mathematics A method of solving equations in which the errors resulting from an initial approximation are reduced by succeeding approximations until all errors are within specified limits.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The act of relaxing, or the state of being relaxed.
  • noun Remission or abatement of rigor.
  • noun Remission of attention or application: as, relaxation of efforts.
  • noun Unbending; recreation; a state or occupation intended to give mental or bodily relief after effort.
  • noun Same as redislocation.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The act or process of relaxing, or the state of being relaxed
  • noun Remission from attention and effort; indulgence in recreation, diversion, or amusement.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The act of relaxing or the state of being relaxed; the opposite of stress or tension; the aim of recreation and leisure activities.
  • noun A diminution of tone, tension, or firmness; specifically in pathology: a looseness; a diminution of the natural and healthy tone of parts.
  • noun Remission or abatement of rigor.
  • noun Remission of attention or application.
  • noun Unbending; recreation; a state or occupation intended to give mental or bodily relief after effort.
  • noun physics The transition of an atom or molecule from a higher energy level to a lower one.
  • noun music The release following musical tension.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a feeling of refreshing tranquility and an absence of tension or worry
  • noun the act of making less strict
  • noun (physics) the exponential return of a system to equilibrium after a disturbance
  • noun an occurrence of control or strength weakening
  • noun a method of solving simultaneous equations by guessing a solution and then reducing the errors that result by successive approximations until all the errors are less than some specified amount
  • noun (physiology) the gradual lengthening of inactive muscle or muscle fibers
  • noun freedom from activity (work or strain or responsibility)

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Fascinated by the striking physiologic changes he noted—a decrease in heart rate, breathing rate, blood pressure, and metabolic rate—he coined the term relaxation response to describe the phenomenon.9 Today, studies continue to replicate these early findings.10

    Our Bodies, Ourselves: Menopause

  • Fascinated by the striking physiologic changes he noted—a decrease in heart rate, breathing rate, blood pressure, and metabolic rate—he coined the term relaxation response to describe the phenomenon.9 Today, studies continue to replicate these early findings.10

    Our Bodies, Ourselves: Menopause

  • Fascinated by the striking physiologic changes he noted—a decrease in heart rate, breathing rate, blood pressure, and metabolic rate—he coined the term relaxation response to describe the phenomenon.9 Today, studies continue to replicate these early findings.10

    Our Bodies, Ourselves: Menopause

  • Fascinated by the striking physiologic changes he noted—a decrease in heart rate, breathing rate, blood pressure, and metabolic rate—he coined the term relaxation response to describe the phenomenon.9 Today, studies continue to replicate these early findings.10

    Our Bodies, Ourselves: Menopause

  • In 1996, RSF published a report entitled Libya: "We can criticize Allah but not Gaddafi" in which it referred to a "relaxation" of restrictions on the media, but noted that journalists critical of the regime spoke to its representatives in hushed tones for fear of reprisals.

    Magda Abu-Fadil: Libyan Media March to Beat of a Different Drummer

  • In 1996, RSF published a report entitled Libya: "We can criticize Allah but not Gaddafi" in which it referred to a "relaxation" of restrictions on the media, but noted that journalists critical of the regime spoke to its representatives in hushed tones for fear of reprisals.

    Magda Abu-Fadil: Libyan Media March to Beat of a Different Drummer

  • In 1996, RSF published a report entitled Libya: "We can criticize Allah but not Gaddafi" in which it referred to a "relaxation" of restrictions on the media, but noted that journalists critical of the regime spoke to its representatives in hushed tones for fear of reprisals.

    Magda Abu-Fadil: Libyan Media March to Beat of a Different Drummer

  • In 1996, RSF published a report entitled Libya: "We can criticize Allah but not Gaddafi" in which it referred to a "relaxation" of restrictions on the media, but noted that journalists critical of the regime spoke to its representatives in hushed tones for fear of reprisals.

    Magda Abu-Fadil: Libyan Media March to Beat of a Different Drummer

  • Dr. Benson began to study the physiological effects of meditation, which he called the relaxation response.

    Meditation as Medicine

  • Dr. Benson began to study the physiological effects of meditation, which he called the relaxation response.

    Meditation as Medicine

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