Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A rubbing away or wearing down by friction.
  • noun A gradual reduction in number or strength because of stress or military action.
  • noun A gradual reduction in personnel or membership because of resignation, retirement, or death, often viewed in contrast to reduction from layoffs.
  • noun Roman Catholic Church Repentance for sin motivated by fear of punishment rather than by love of God.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The rubbing of one thing against another; mutual friction: as, the abrasion of coins by attrition.
  • noun The act of wearing away by rubbing; the state of being worn down or smoothed by friction; abrasion.
  • noun In theology, imperfect contrition or repentance, with real detestation of sin, and a true purpose of amendment, arising from those supernatural motives of faith which are lower than charity, or the true love of God for his own infinite perfections.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The act of rubbing together; friction; the act of wearing by friction, or by rubbing substances together; abrasion.
  • noun The state of being worn.
  • noun (Theol.) Grief for sin arising only from fear of punishment or feelings of shame. See Contrition.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun wearing or grinding down by friction
  • noun the gradual reduction in a tangible or intangible resource due to causes that are passive and do not involve productive use of the resource.
  • noun A gradual, natural reduction in membership or personnel, as through retirement, resignation, or death
  • noun sciences The loss of participants during an experiment
  • noun theology Imperfect contrition or remorse

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun sorrow for sin arising from fear of damnation
  • noun a wearing down to weaken or destroy
  • noun the wearing down of rock particles by friction due to water or wind or ice
  • noun erosion by friction
  • noun the act of rubbing together; wearing something down by friction

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English attricioun, regret, breaking, from Old French attrition, abrasion, from Late Latin attrītiō, attrītiōn-, act of rubbing against, from Latin attrītus, past participle of atterere, to rub against : ad-, against; see ad– + terere, to rub; see terə- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin attritio ("a rubbing against"), from the verb attritus, past participle of atterere ("to wear"), from ad- ("to, towards") + terere ("to rub").

Examples

  • Almost all of the attrition is among students with very low grades.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » Affirmative Action in Law Schools, Pt. 2

  • For instance; that after the long course of a most lewd and flagitious life, a man may be reconciled to God, and have his sins forgiven at the last gasp, upon confession of them to the priest, with that imperfect degree of contrition for them, which they call attrition, together with the absolution of the priest.

    The Works of Dr. John Tillotson, Late Archbishop of Canterbury. Vol. 04.

  • Some of this attrition is due to financial factors indeed, but a majority of the attrition is due to other factors such as poor academic preparation.

    Taxes and Market Time, Arnold Kling | EconLog | Library of Economics and Liberty

  • All the attrition is difficult to get a read on, particularly when one of the best players to come through McDermott's program, Wesley Johnson, is starring at Syracuse.

    Big 12 Conference

  • Perhaps more subtly considered the "JPII priest" attrition is simply a recent example of the perennial struggle for the celibate priest in his affectivity and relationships, in his heart and most especially in his spousal and paternal love.

    Pope John Paul II

  • Leadership attrition is a major problem for any type of army.

    Coyote Blog » Blog Archive » Still Missing the Point

  • Perhaps more subtly considered the "JPII priest" attrition is simply a recent example of the perennial struggle for the celibate priest in his affectivity and relationships, in his heart and most especially in his spousal and paternal love.

    Insight Scoop | The Ignatius Press Blog:

  • Men and women have near-equal NIH funding success at all stages of their careers, which makes it very unlikely that female attrition is due to negative selection from NIH grant-funding decisions.

    Archive 2008-12-01

  • Men and women have near-equal NIH funding success at all stages of their careers, which makes it very unlikely that female attrition is due to negative selection from NIH grant-funding decisions.

    You Didn't Think You Could Win, Did You?

  • Cry ‚ Äôs of success when attrition is allowed to meet the sacrifice that year.

    Budget Update - NASA Watch

Comments

New comments are temporarily disabled while we update our database.

  • "Bartenders at Fangtasia didn't tend to last long. Eric and Pam always tried to hire someone colorful--an exotic bartender drew in the human tourists who came by the busloads to take a walk on the wild side--and in this they were successful. But somehow the job had acquired a high attrition rate."-Dead as a Doornail, by Charlaine Harris

    May 19, 2011