Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The act of readjusting, or the state of being readjusted.
  • noun Specifically, in United States politics, the political schemes of the Readjusters.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A second adjustment; a new or different adjustment.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun a second, or subsequent adjustment

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the act of adjusting again (to changed circumstances)
  • noun the act of adjusting something to match a standard

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Instead of a small, painful economic readjustment from a short-lived boom, the little town's industries are slaughtered as waves of default, unemployment, and credit contraction drown each neighborhood and industrial park.

    LewRockwell.com

  • My readjustment will be a slow process and should involve a gentle transition away from the media spotlight.

    Rupert Murdoch is No Hero

  • If these two great movements of our age, having this as their object, can be brought into close harmony and co-operation, the readjustment will be the sooner and more painlessly accomplished; but, for the moment, the two movements alike in their origin and alike in many of their methods of procedure, remain distinct.

    Woman and Labour

  • There is the legislative body with its multiplied parties; there is the restless democracy behind, and every measure of taxation and readjustment, which is bound to press hard upon the human unit of the country, before it can go into force, or be legislated upon, has to be dealt with on the basis of such a democracy based on universal suffrage.

    The European Situation

  • The town, which had lived, fought, lost, and suffered not as a group of individuals, but as a psychological unit, had surrendered at last, less to the idea of readjustment than to the indomitable purpose of a single mind.

    Virginia

  • Freedom and facility of readjustment, that is to say capacity for growth in social structure, therefore depends in great measure on the degree of freedom with which the situation at any given time acts on the individual members of the community-the degree of exposure of the individual members to the constraining forces of the environment.

    The theory of the leisure class; an economic study of institutions

  • Freedom and facility of readjustment, that is to say capacity for growth in social structure, therefore depends in great measure on the degree of freedom with which the situation at any given time acts on the individual members of the community-the degree of exposure of the individual members to the constraining forces of the environment.

    Theory of the Leisure Class

  • If these two great movements of our age, having this as their object, can be brought into close harmony and co-operation, the readjustment will be the sooner and more painlessly accomplished; but, for the moment, the two movements alike in their origin and alike in many of their methods of procedure, remain distinct.

    Woman and Labour

  • Maybe I will sound too much like an old puritanical Marxist, ranting about the capitalist conspiracy to lure gullible consumers into buying more and more, if I say that the coming reduction of affluence what economists call a "readjustment" in disposable income might not necessarily be such a terrible thing.

    Telegraph.co.uk - Telegraph online, Daily Telegraph and Sunday Telegraph

  • Perhaps it might be called a readjustment; surely Ms. Rice would approve of such semantics.

    CounterPunch

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