Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The state or condition of being shamefast.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Modesty; bashfulness; shamefacedness.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

shamefast +‎ -ness

Examples

  • Then said I, ‘O my God, I call Thee to witness that I abstain from this Christian woman this night, of shamefastness before Thee and fear of Thy vengeance!’

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • The wife of a Count Octave, having quitted her husband for another, has repented of her fault and separated from her lover, but, through shamefastness, will not return to her husband.

    Balzac

  • Doubtless her soul was brimming over with shamelessness, since she swerved so far from shamefastness, as without a blush to seek solace for her wrong in her daughter's infamy.

    The Danish History, Books I-IX

  • Count Octave, having quitted her husband for another, has repented of her fault and separated from her lover, but, through shamefastness, will not return to her husband.

    Balzac

  • From the fame and memory of him that begot me I have learned both shamefastness and manlike behaviour.

    Meditations

  • To his grandfather he owed his own gentle spirit, to his father shamefastness and courage; he learnt of his mother to be religious and bountiful and single-minded.

    Meditations

  • Her cheeks crimsoned with maiden shamefastness, but the blue eyes met mine without a hint of maiden fear, and for that thanks as well as reverence filled my heart as I bowed to her.

    The Yeoman Adventurer

  • Which, like as in the first years of their childhood they make much and be fond and proud of such ornaments, so when they be a little more grown in years and discretion, perceiving that none but children do wear such toys and trifles, they lay them away even of their own shamefastness, without any bidding of their parents, even as our children when they wax big, do caste away nuts, brooches and dolls.

    English Literature for Boys and Girls

  • It is notorious that even a renowned piece of sculptured marble which produces in one person a kind of religious tranquility and philosophic contemplation, with a sense of the eternity of form and the transience of passion, may at the same instant excite in another beholder such shamefastness that he will cry out for fig leaves, or such unruly emotions as, unchecked, may disrupt society.

    Unprintable

  • Thence we have that charming shamefastness, that veiled and exquisite sobriety, equally far removed from the sentimental rhetoric too familiar to the Latin races, and the reflective simplicity of Germany, which are so admirably displayed in the ballads published by M. de la Villemarqué.

    The Poetry of the Celtic Races. I.

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