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decertification

Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The act or process of decertifying.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • That pressure included a threat to begin decertification proceedings against USATF.

    USATODAY.com - Background: Jerome Young case

  • A clause in the current labor deal says that if players wait until after the agreement's expiration to decertify the union, the owners could not claim in court that the decertification is a sham.

    NFL players will seek to block lockout in court, sources say

  • The amended complaint alleges that the decertification is a sham.

    NFL Girds For Fight, Says Loss Is Covered

  • The league, however, said the decertification is a sham and that the lockout is legal.

    Hearing Fails to End NFL Lockout

  • The argument that the decertification is a sham will form the backbone of the league's litigation strategy as it tries to prove the players union is simply trying to escape its obligation to collective bargaining.

    NFL Girds For Fight, Says Loss Is Covered

  • Fisher referred to decertification as a "drastic move that leaves every player without pensions, without health care" and without the legal protections of the union.

    NYT > Home Page

  • Fisher referred to decertification as a "drastic move that leaves every player without pensions, without health care" and without the legal protections of the union.

    NYT > Home Page

  • The players, after team owners failed to meet union demands to open up their financial records, moved to formally dissolve their union, a process known as decertification.

    Boston.com Top Stories

  • If the NLRB agrees with the owners that the decertification is a sham, conducted simply to gain bargaining advantage, the players could be forced to return to the table with their suit jeopardized and legal strategy in shambles.

    The Seattle Times

  • The threat of the process known as decertification by players, combined with owners' desire to avoid the Minneapolis courtroom of federal Judge David S. Doty, played into the owners' move to try to work out a deal now, before a work stoppage began.

    NYT > Home Page

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