Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The act of elongating or the condition of being elongated.
  • n. Something that elongates; an extension.
  • n. The angular distance between two celestial bodies as seen from Earth.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The act of lengthening, or the state of being lengthened; protraction; extension.
  • n. That which lengthens out; continuation.
  • n. The ratio of the extension of a material to the length of the material prior to stretching.
  • n. Removal to a distance; withdrawal; a being at a distance; distance.
  • n. The angular distance of a planet from the sun; as, the elongation of Venus or Mercury.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The act of lengthening, or the state of being lengthened; protraction; extension.
  • n. That which lengthens out; continuation.
  • n. Removal to a distance; withdrawal; a being at a distance; distance.
  • n. The angular distance of a planet from the sun.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The act of elongating or lengthening; the state of being elongated or lengthened.
  • n. Extension; continuation.
  • n. Distance; space which separates one thing from another.
  • n. A removing to a distance; removal; recession.
  • n. In astronomy: The angular distance of a planet from the sun, as it appears to the eye of a spectator on the earth; apparent departure of a planet from the sun in its orbit: as, the elongation of Venus or Mercury.
  • n. The angular distance of a satellite from its primary.
  • n. In surgery: A partial dislocation, occasioned by the stretching or lengthening of the ligaments.
  • n. The extension of a part beyond its natural dimensions.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the act of lengthening something
  • n. the quality of being elongated
  • n. an addition to the length of something

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Nucleosomes inhibit the initiation of transcription but allow chain elongation with the displacement of histones.

    Roger D. Kornberg - Autobiography

  • What would happen, I reasoned, is that one or more of them would be added to the oligonucleotide by the polymerase prior to the termination of chain elongation by addition of the dideoxynucleoside triphosphate, and it could easily be the wrong dideoxynucleoside triphosphate and it surely would result in an extension product that would be the wrong size, and the results would be spurious.

    Kary B. Mullis - Nobel Lecture

  • This figure is known as the elongation at fracture, or briefly, the "elongation," and is generally taken to be a measure of ductility.

    The Working of Steel Annealing, Heat Treating and Hardening of Carbon and Alloy Steel

  • One interesting example is axis elongation, which is just what it sounds like: the embryo stretches out until it clearly has a long axis, then continues to elongate to form something with a head and a tail and everything in between.

    The Panda's Thumb: August 2010 Archives

  • Guo S, Yamaguchi Y, Schilbach S, Wada T, Goddard A, et al. (2000) A regulator of transcriptional elongation, which is required for vertebrate neuronal development.

    PLoS ONE Alerts: New Articles

  • Genes in the universal ancestor that were already homologs of each other (the paralogs such as elongation factors EF-1and EF-G used to root the universal tree, for instance [37]) of course complicate this view.

    A Disclaimer for Behe?

  • Elongated slots are recesses in workpieces which are made with a limited length in the form of the "elongation" of a workpiece bore hole by milling into a given direction.

    5. Milling of elongated slots

  • There must be physical continuity between parent, or parents, and offspring, so that the offspring is, as Erasmus Darwin well said, a kind of elongation of the life of the parent.

    Essays on Life, Art and Science

  • Indeed, signs of "elongation" were thought to be perceptible with the Greenwich 28-inch refractor, [1450] while only round images could be seen at Lick. [

    A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century Fourth Edition

  • Her most mannerist anatomical tell, at least in this series, is the spindly, balletic elongation of her sirens 'legs; an unsettling, haunting gesture that underscores the mythological quality of her scenes.

    A Turkey Day dance recital

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