Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The act or process of connoting.
  • n. An idea or meaning suggested by or associated with a word or thing: Hollywood holds connotations of romance and glittering success.
  • n. The set of associations implied by a word in addition to its literal meaning.
  • n. Logic The set of attributes constituting the meaning of a term; intension.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A meaning of a word or phrase that is suggested or implied, as opposed to a denotation, or literal meaning. A characteristic of words or phrases, or of the contexts that words and phrases are used in.
  • n. A technical term in logic used by J. S. Mill and later logicians to refer to the attribute or aggregate of attributes connoted by a term, and contrasted with denotation.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The act of connoting; a making known or designating something additional; implication of something more than is asserted.
  • n. a meaning implied but not explicitly denoted by some word or expression, which may be understood in addition to the explicit primary meaning.
  • n. the full set of necessary properties possessed by all the objects within the extension of a term; the intensional meaning of a term, which determines the objects to which the term applies; the intension of a term.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Secondary denotation; reference to something besides the object named.
  • n. That which constitutes the meaning of a word; the aggregation of attributes expressed by a word; that which a word means or implies: distinguished from denotation. See extract, and connote, v.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an idea that is implied or suggested
  • n. what you must know in order to determine the reference of an expression

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.