Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The act or process of connoting.
  • noun An idea or meaning suggested by or associated with a word or thing.
  • noun The set of associations implied by a word in addition to its literal meaning.
  • noun Logic The set of attributes constituting the meaning of a term; intension.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Secondary denotation; reference to something besides the object named.
  • noun That which constitutes the meaning of a word; the aggregation of attributes expressed by a word; that which a word means or implies: distinguished from denotation. See extract, and connote, v.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The act of connoting; a making known or designating something additional; implication of something more than is asserted.
  • noun a meaning implied but not explicitly denoted by some word or expression, which may be understood in addition to the explicit primary meaning.
  • noun (Logic) the full set of necessary properties possessed by all the objects within the extension of a term; the intensional meaning of a term, which determines the objects to which the term applies; the intension of a term.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A meaning of a word or phrase that is suggested or implied, as opposed to a denotation, or literal meaning. A characteristic of words or phrases, or of the contexts that words and phrases are used in.
  • noun A technical term in logic used by J. S. Mill and later logicians to refer to the attribute or aggregate of attributes connoted by a term, and contrasted with denotation.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun an idea that is implied or suggested
  • noun what you must know in order to determine the reference of an expression

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Though the words and phrases are vague and suggest different things to different people their connotation is always favorable: "The concepts and programs of the propagandist are always good, desirable, virtuous."

    Propaganda

  • The phrase that Walt popularized that raises hackles, because it is a name, which implies a (corporate) entity being named and is for that reason vaguely conspiratorial in connotation, is “Israel Lobby.”

    Matthew Yglesias » A Valentine From Steven Walt

  • Trago does not strictly mean an alcoholic drink, although that connotation is very strong.

    Trago always alcohol?

  • When I hear your name mentioned, or think of you, up, at once, flashes that memory picture, and with it, it's connotation, & its connotation is "noble."

    Jack London's Literary Mother

  • Trago does not strictly mean an alcoholic drink, although that connotation is very strong.

    Trago always alcohol?

  • Trago does not strictly mean an alcoholic drink, although that connotation is very strong.

    Trago always alcohol?

  • He's trying to reconcile a new word connotation associated with being upset with something that he already understands as having to do with polar bears and snow.

    Turnstyle: Talking Sh*t about Sh*t My Students Write

  • Trago does not strictly mean an alcoholic drink, although that connotation is very strong.

    Trago always alcohol?

  • He's trying to reconcile a new word connotation associated with being upset with something that he already understands as having to do with polar bears and snow.

    Turnstyle: Talking Sh*t about Sh*t My Students Write

  • Trago does not strictly mean an alcoholic drink, although that connotation is very strong.

    Trago always alcohol?

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