Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. An abrupt, forceful utterance: an exclamation of delight.
  • n. An outcry, as of protest.
  • n. Grammar An interjection.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A loud calling or crying out; outcry; loud or emphatic utterance; vehement vociferation; clamor; that which is cried out, as an expression of feeling; sudden expression of sound or words indicative of emotion, as in surprise, pain, grief, joy, anger, etc.
  • n. A word expressing outcry; an interjection; a word expressing passion, as wonder, fear, or grief.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A loud calling or crying out; outcry; loud or emphatic utterance; vehement vociferation; clamor; that which is cried out, as an expression of feeling; sudden expression of sound or words indicative of emotion, as in surprise, pain, grief, joy, anger, etc.
  • n. A word expressing outcry; an interjection; a word expressing passion, as wonder, fear, or grief.
  • n. A mark or sign by which outcry or emphatic utterance is marked; thus [!]; -- called also exclamation point.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The act of exclaiming; an ejaculatory expression of surprise, admiration, pain, anger, dissent, or the like; an emphatic or clamorous outcry.
  • n. That which is uttered with emphasis or passion; a vehement speech or saying.
  • n. The mark or sign in writing and printing (!) by which emphatic utterance or interjectional force is indicated: usually called exclamation mark or -point, and formerly note of admiration. See ecphoneme.
  • n. In grammar, a word expressing outcry; an interjection; a word expressing some passion, as wonder, fear, or grief.
  • n. In rhet, same as ecphonesis, 1.
  • n. In the Gr. Ch., same as ecphonesis, 2.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an abrupt excited utterance
  • n. a loud complaint or protest or reproach
  • n. an exclamatory rhetorical device

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • An exclamation from the blacks for'ard sent both men glancing seaward.

    A SON OF THE SUN

  • ‘I scribble, underline, note, add, cross out, put in exclamation marks, turn down corners – even sometimes jot down phone numbers and PINs and reminders to buy cat food.’

    Commiserations and a Meme « Tales from the Reading Room

  • As an interjection, “a word or phrase used in exclamation,” the function of “hooray” even has a sense excitement.

    blog – syllable studio

  • The prompted exclamation is always, at heart, "This could not happen!"

    On the Sublime

  • Accompanied by a simultaneous fourfold exclamation from the other vampire hunters of the closural "Amen"

    Phonemanography: Romantic to Victorian

  • He leapt into the air and pumped the right hand that held his stick in exclamation as a sellout crowd once again roared ` ` Mart-tee, Mart-tee. ''

    USATODAY.com

  • What exclamation is derived from a Greek word meaning "I have found it", which was supposedly shouted by Archimedes when he discovered that a body displaces its own volume when immersed in water?

    The Friday Brain-teaser from Credo Reference

  • Although she may write in exclamation points — the recent press release had three — Ms. Pappas does not speak in them.

    NYTimes finds a pretty & fun feminist!

  • Keep letting your correspondent know how much you like and respect him, praise and flatter him, constantly demonstrate your puppyish friendliness, and stick in exclamation points (and sometimes even smiling face icons) wherever possible.

    janet malcom | pandora’s click « poetry dispatch & other notes from the underground

  • My brother had his other hand on the wheel, his index finger raised like a flagpole in exclamation at the music.

    Whitmore, 1969

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