Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The act of embarking.
  • n. The process of loading military personnel and vehicles etc into ships or aircraft.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The act of putting or going on board of a vessel.
  • n. That which is embarked.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The act of putting or going on board ship; the act of setting out or sending off by water.
  • n. That which is embarked.
  • n. The vessel on which something is embarked.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the act of passengers and crew getting aboard a ship or aircraft

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Alabama, the banks of which are frequently high and steep, a more dashing style of embarkation is adopted.

    Loading Cotton on the Alabama River

  • Early in the morning had all the bundles put on the asses, and carried to the place of embarkation, which is a village called

    The Journal of a Mission to the Interior of Africa, in the Year 1805

  • Then there's the point of embarkation, that is the point of transition from ordinary life to being a pilgrim on a quest.

    Stewart Brand on the Long Now

  • On the other hand, there is evidence that some of the officers in charge of boats quite expected the embarkation was a precautionary measure and they would all return after daylight.

    The Loss of the S. S. Titanic Its Story and Its Lessons

  • They were detained, of course, and the embarkation was accomplished without the

    Maria Edgeworth

  • The embarkation was a speedy one, for the cargo was soon stowed in lockers and under seats, Sylvia forwarded to her place in the bow; Mark, as commander of the craft, took the helm; Moor and Warwick, as crew, sat waiting orders; and Hugh, the coachman, stood ready to push off at word of command.

    Moods

  • -- Early in the morning had all the bundles put on the asses, and carried to the place of embarkation, which is a village called

    The Journal of a Mission to the Interior of Africa, in the Year 1805

  • According to India's health ministry, these pilgrims would be medically examined for the symptoms of influenza A (H1N1) at the point of embarkation, that is at the place where booking of pilgrims takes place in their respective states.

    India eNews

  • Elizabeth and I should commence our journey by water, sleeping that night at Evian, and continuing our voyage on the following day. the day was fair, the wind favourable, all smiled on our nuptial embarkation.

    Chapter 22

  • There have been settlements in the area for more than 2,000 years, but the present city was founded by St. Louis in 1240 as his kingdom's first Mediterranean seaport, a convenient embarkation point for the Crusades.

    The Salt of the Earth

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