Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To make claim for; demand.
  • transitive v. To assume or assert the truth, reality, or necessity of, especially as a basis of an argument.
  • transitive v. To assume as a premise or axiom; take for granted. See Synonyms at presume.
  • n. Something assumed without proof as being self-evident or generally accepted, especially when used as a basis for an argument: "the postulate that there is little moral difference between the superpowers” ( Henry A. Kissinger).
  • n. A fundamental element; a basic principle.
  • n. Mathematics An axiom.
  • n. A requirement; a prerequisite.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Something assumed without proof as being self-evident or generally accepted, especially when used as a basis for an argument.
  • n. A fundamental element; a basic principle.
  • n. An axiom.
  • n. A requirement; a prerequisite.
  • v. To assume as a truthful or accurate premise or axiom, especially as a basis of an argument.
  • v. (Christianity, historical) To appoint or request one's appointment to an ecclesiastical office.
  • v. (obsolete) To request, demand or claim for oneself.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Something demanded or asserted; especially, a position or supposition assumed without proof, or one which is considered as self-evident; a truth to which assent may be demanded or challenged, without argument or evidence.
  • n. The enunciation of a self-evident problem, in distinction from an axiom, which is the enunciation of a self-evident theorem.
  • adj. Postulated.
  • transitive v. To beg, or assume without proof.
  • transitive v. To take without express consent; to assume.
  • transitive v. To invite earnestly; to solicit.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To invite; solicit; require by entreaty. See def. 3.
  • To assume without proof; lay down as something which has to be assumed, although it cannot be proved; take for granted.
  • In ecclesiastical law, to ask legitimate ecclesiastical authority to admit (a nominee) by dispensation, when a canonical impediment is supposed to exist. Lee, Glossary.
  • To make postulates or demands; urge a suit.
  • n. A petition; a suit; solicitation.
  • n. A proposition proposed for acceptance without proof; something taken for granted; an assumption.
  • n. A self-evident practical proposition, to the effect that something is possible: opposed to an axiom, as a self-evident proposition that something is impossible.
  • n. A condition for the accomplishment of anything.
  • Postulated; assumed.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. (logic) a proposition that is accepted as true in order to provide a basis for logical reasoning
  • v. take as a given; assume as a postulate or axiom
  • v. maintain or assert
  • v. require as useful, just, or proper

Etymologies

Medieval Latin postulāre, postulāt-, to nominate to a bishopric, to assume, from Latin, to request; see prek- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Medieval Latin postulātum, past participle of postulāre ("to assume" later "to appoint or request ecclesiastical appointment"), from Latin, postulō ("request"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

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