Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A torch formerly used for lighting one's way in the streets.
  • noun One of the rings or loops forming a chain.
  • noun A unit in a connected series of units.
  • noun A unit in a transportation or communications system.
  • noun A connecting element; a tie or bond.
  • noun An association; a relationship.
  • noun A causal, parallel, or reciprocal relationship; a correlation.
  • noun A cufflink.
  • noun A unit of length used in surveying, equal to 0.01 chain, 7.92 inches, or about 20.12 centimeters.
  • noun A rod or lever transmitting motion in a machine.
  • noun Computers A graphical item or segment of text in a webpage or other electronic document that, when clicked, causes another webpage or section of the same webpage to be displayed.
  • intransitive verb To put together physically, as with links.
  • intransitive verb To connect, relate, or associate: synonym: join.
  • intransitive verb To make or have a link to (another webpage or electronic document).
  • intransitive verb To make a link in (a webpage or electronic document).
  • intransitive verb To be or become joined together physically.
  • intransitive verb To be or become connected, related, or associated.
  • intransitive verb To make or have a link to a webpage or electronic document.
  • intransitive verb To follow a link in a webpage or electronic document.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A crook or winding of a river; the ground lying along such a winding: as, the links of the Forth.
  • noun plural A stretch of flat or slightly undulating ground on the sea-shore, often in part sandy and covered with bent-grass, furze, etc., and sometimes with a good sward, on part of it at least.
  • noun plural The ground on which golf is played.
  • noun plural The ground on which golf is played.
  • To unite or connect by or as if by a link or links; unite by something intervening; unite in any way; couple; join.
  • To be or become connected; be joined in marriage; ally one's self; form a union.
  • noun A torch made of tow or hards, etc., and pitch, carried for lighting the streets, formerly common in Great Britain, and still used in London in fogs.
  • To go smartly; trip along; do anything smartly and quickly.
  • noun In mathematics:
  • noun A piece of a straight line joining two given points.
  • noun A double tangent.
  • noun In music, a connecting passage of one or more measures, intervening between two well-defined sections or phrases.
  • To burn or give light.
  • noun One of the rings or separate pieces of which a chain is composed. In ornamental chain-making, any member of the chain, of whatever form, as a plaque, a bead, etc., is called a link.
  • noun Anything doubled and closed together like a ring or division of a chain.
  • noun Anything which serves to connect one thing or one part of a thing with another; any constituent part of a connected series.
  • noun A division, forming the hundredth part, of the chain used in surveying and for other measurement.
  • noun One of the divisions of a sausage made in a continuous chain.
  • noun Any rigid movable piece connected with other pieces, generally themselves movable, by means of interlinked open ends or pivots about which it can turn.
  • noun In a steam-engine, the link-motion.
  • noun In zoology, specifically, an unknown hypothetical form of animal life in any evolutionary chain or series, assumed to have existed at some time and thus to have been the connecting-link between some known forms; especially, an anthropomorphic animal supposed to have been derived from some simian and to have been the immediate ancestral stock of the human race; hence, humorously, an ape or monkey taken as itself the connectinglink for which Darwinians seek. See Alalus.
  • To join or connect with other parts of the same or similar systems: as, in topography, to connect two isolated surveys or systems of points and geometrical lines, with one another, by joining one point in each of the two systems by a line of measured length and direction.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • intransitive verb To be connected.
  • noun Scot. & Prov. Eng. A hill or ridge, as a sand hill, or a wooded or turfy bank between cultivated fields, etc.
  • noun Scot. A winding of a river; also, the ground along such a winding; a meander; -- usually in pl.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Possibly from Medieval Latin linchinus, lichnus, candle, from Latin lychnus, from Greek lukhnos, lamp; see leuk- in Indo-European roots.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English linke, of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse hlekkr, *hlenkr, from *hlenkr.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Origin unknown.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Plausibly a modification of Medieval Latin linchinus ("candle"), an alteration of Latin lynchinus, itself from Ancient Greek λύχνος (lukhnos, "lamp").

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old English linke probably from Old Norse *hlenkr, from Proto-Germanic. Used in English since the 14th century.

Examples

  • Aodhhan: There certainly is a common link between China and the US; about a trillion link$.

    US, China Agree to Discuss Cooperation in Space | Universe Today

  • Sign up to volunteer at this link | Contribute what you can at this link**

    “Independent Democrat” | spazeboy

  • Check for any external [link] Commands, if they exist trim them out and activate the 'Jump to Link' button (run, % link%)

    AutoHotkey Community

  • Check for any external [link] Commands, if they exist trim them out and activate the 'Jump to Link' button (run, \% link\%)

    AutoHotkey Community

  • For a link command, you need to use +link: www. domain.com / filename and for a linkdomain command, you need to use +linkdomain: www. domain.com.

    Search Engine Roundtable

  • Not that we speak for them. click this here link, then click on a category in the right sidebar to leave your nominated blog * plus link* in the comments.

    Progressive Bloggers

  • The mere presence of links might not seem so notable — except that only one of the Times’ 10 other op-ed columnists had included even a single link in his or her most recent piece.via Frank Rich: Why I link» Nieman Journalism Lab» Pushing to the Future of Journalism ...

    Frank Rich: Why I link » Nieman Journalism Lab

  • In case you forgot how to use it, Barry explains that "for a link command, you need to use +link: www. domain.com / filename and for a linkdomain command, you need to use

    Search Engine Roundtable

  • In case you forgot how to use it, Barry explains that "for a link command, you need to use +link: www. domain.com / filename and for a linkdomain command, you need to use

    Search Engine Roundtable

  • + Click on the title link - document opens in Scribd - a bit small to read but you can toggle for full screen.

    Internet News: Search Engines Archives

Comments

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  • Create links between words and enter your definition of the relation between them (and see what others think as well here.

    Takes a bit of exploration/practice with the cursor...

    October 21, 2009