Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The place where a structure or group of structures was, is, or is to be located.
  • noun The place or setting of something.
  • noun A website.
  • transitive verb To situate or locate on a site.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Sorrow; grief; misery; trouble.
  • noun Sinfulness; sin.
  • To select a site for; place; locate.
  • noun Position, especially with reference to environment; situation; location.
  • noun The ground on which anything is, has been, or is to be located.
  • noun Posture; attitude; pose.
  • noun In fortification, the ground occupied by a work: also called plane of site.
  • To grieve; mourn.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The place where anything is fixed; situation; local position.
  • noun A place fitted or chosen for any certain permanent use or occupation.
  • noun rare The posture or position of a thing.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun obsolete Sorrow, grief.
  • noun The place where anything is fixed; situation; local position; as, the site of a city or of a house.
  • noun A place fitted or chosen for any certain permanent use or occupation; as, a site for a church.
  • noun The posture or position of a thing.
  • noun A computer installation, particularly one associated with an intranet or internet service or telecommunications.
  • noun A website.
  • verb architecture To situate or place a building.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the piece of land on which something is located (or is to be located)
  • noun a computer connected to the internet that maintains a series of web pages on the World Wide Web
  • noun physical position in relation to the surroundings
  • verb assign a location to

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin situs; see situs.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Probably from Old Norse (compare Norwegian syt).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English, from Anglo-Norman site, from Latin situs ("position, place, site"), from sinere ("to put, lay, set down, usually let, suffer, permit").

Examples

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