Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • intransitive verb To put or bring together so as to make continuous or form a unit.
  • intransitive verb To put or bring into close association or relationship.
  • intransitive verb To connect (points), as with a straight line.
  • intransitive verb To meet and merge with.
  • intransitive verb To become a part or member of.
  • intransitive verb To come into the company of.
  • intransitive verb To participate with in an act or activity.
  • intransitive verb To adjoin.
  • intransitive verb To engage in; enter into.
  • intransitive verb To come together so as to form a connection.
  • intransitive verb To act together; form an alliance.
  • intransitive verb To become a member of a group.
  • intransitive verb To take part; participate.
  • noun A joint; a junction.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In geometry, the straight determined by two points.
  • noun An abbreviation of joinery.
  • To put or bring together; bring into conjunction, or into association or harmony; unite; combine; associate: as, to join two planks by tenons; to join forces in an undertaking.
  • To unite, as one thing to or with another; bring into conjunction or association; cause to be united or connected in any way: followed by to or with.
  • To unite or form a junction with; become connected with or a part of; come into association or union with: as, to join a church, party, or society; the Missouri river joins the Mississippi; to join one in an enterprise.
  • To unite or take part in, in a friendly or hostile manner; engage in with another or others: as, he joined issue with his opponent; the forces joined battle.
  • To adjoin; be adjacent or contiguous to: as, his land joins mine.
  • To enjoin; command.
  • To be contiguous or close; lie or come together; form a junction.
  • To unite or become associated; confederate; league.
  • To meet in hostile encounter; join battle.
  • To draw, as the sect of which A and B are the end points.
  • noun The place where two things are joined; the line or surface of juncture; a joint; also, the mode of joining.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Geom.) The line joining two points; the point common to two intersecting lines.
  • noun The place or part where objects have been joined; a joint; a seam.
  • noun (Computers) The combining of multiple tables to answer a query in a relational database system.
  • intransitive verb To be contiguous, close, or in contact; to come together; to unite; to mingle; to form a union
  • transitive verb To bring together, literally or figuratively; to place in contact; to connect; to couple; to unite; to combine; to associate; to add; to append.
  • transitive verb To associate one's self to; to be or become connected with; to league one's self with; to unite with
  • transitive verb To unite in marriage.
  • transitive verb Obs. & R. To enjoin upon; to command.
  • transitive verb To accept, or engage in, as a contest.
  • transitive verb To meet with and accompany.
  • transitive verb To combine with (another person) in performing some activity.
  • transitive verb See under Battle, Issue.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb To combine more than one item into one; to put together.
  • verb To come together; to meet.
  • verb To come into the company of.
  • verb To become a member of.
  • verb computing, databases, transitive To produce an intersection of data in two or more database tables.
  • noun An intersection of piping or wiring; an interconnect.
  • noun computing, databases An intersection of data in two or more database tables.
  • noun algebra The lowest upper bound, an operation between pairs of elements in a lattice, denoted by the symbol .

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb be or become joined or united or linked
  • verb make contact or come together

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English joinen, from Old French joindre, joign-, join-, from Latin iungere; see yeug- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old French joindre, from Latin iungō ("join, yoke"), from Proto-Indo-European *yeug- “to join, unite”.

Examples

  • The simple reason I want to join is to "make friends", ease our integration to a new culture, and learn a thing or two the simpler way rather than the hard way (aka: why reinvent the wheel).

    The Brick Wall and Expats

  • The simple reason I want to join is to "make friends", ease our integration to a new culture, and learn a thing or two the simpler way rather than the hard way (aka: why reinvent the wheel).

    The Brick Wall and Expats

  • The simple reason I want to join is to "make friends", ease our integration to a new culture, and learn a thing or two the simpler way rather than the hard way (aka: why reinvent the wheel).

    The Brick Wall and Expats

  • The simple reason I want to join is to "make friends", ease our integration to a new culture, and learn a thing or two the simpler way rather than the hard way (aka: why reinvent the wheel).

    The Brick Wall and Expats

  • The simple reason I want to join is to "make friends", ease our integration to a new culture, and learn a thing or two the simpler way rather than the hard way (aka: why reinvent the wheel).

    The Brick Wall and Expats

  • The simple reason I want to join is to "make friends", ease our integration to a new culture, and learn a thing or two the simpler way rather than the hard way (aka: why reinvent the wheel).

    The Brick Wall and Expats

  • The simple reason I want to join is to "make friends", ease our integration to a new culture, and learn a thing or two the simpler way rather than the hard way (aka: why reinvent the wheel).

    The Brick Wall and Expats

  • The simple reason I want to join is to "make friends", ease our integration to a new culture, and learn a thing or two the simpler way rather than the hard way (aka: why reinvent the wheel).

    The Brick Wall and Expats

  • The simple reason I want to join is to "make friends", ease our integration to a new culture, and learn a thing or two the simpler way rather than the hard way (aka: why reinvent the wheel).

    The Brick Wall and Expats

  • The simple reason I want to join is to "make friends", ease our integration to a new culture, and learn a thing or two the simpler way rather than the hard way (aka: why reinvent the wheel).

    The Brick Wall and Expats

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.