Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Harmony or agreement of interests or feelings; accord.
  • noun A treaty establishing peaceful relations.
  • noun Grammar Agreement between words in person, number, gender, or case.
  • noun Music A harmonious combination of simultaneously sounded tones.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Agreement between persons; union in opinions, sentiments, views, or interests; unanimity; harmony; accord; peace.
  • noun Agreement between things; mutual fitness; harmony.
  • noun In music: The simultaneous combination of tones that are in tune or in harmony with each other: opposed to discord.
  • noun Specifically, a simultaneous combination of two or more tones, which has a final and satisfactory effect when taken alone, without preparation or resolution.
  • noun A compact; an agreement by stipulation; a treaty.
  • noun In English law, an agreement between the parties in a fine, made by leave of the court, prior to the abolition of that mode of conveyance.
  • noun In grammar, agreement of words in construction, as adjectives with nouns in gender, number, and case, or verbs with nouns or pronouns in number and person.
  • To agree; coöperate.
  • To reconcile; bring into harmony.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A variety of American grape, with large dark blue (almost black) grapes in compact clusters.
  • noun A state of agreement; harmony; union.
  • noun obsolete Agreement by stipulation; compact; covenant; treaty or league.
  • noun (Gram.) Agreement of words with one another, in gender, number, person, or case.
  • noun (Old Law) An agreement between the parties to a fine of land in reference to the manner in which it should pass, being an acknowledgment that the land in question belonged to the complainant. See Fine.
  • noun (Mus.) An agreeable combination of tones simultaneously heard; a consonant chord; consonance; harmony.
  • intransitive verb obsolete To agree; to act together.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb intransitive, obsolete To agree; to act together - Edward Hyde Clarendon
  • noun A state of agreement; harmony; union.
  • noun obsolete Agreement by stipulation; compact; covenant; treaty or league
  • noun grammar Agreement of words with one another, in gender, number, person, or case.
  • noun : An agreement between the parties to a fine of land in reference to the manner in which it should pass, being an acknowledgment that the land in question belonged to the complainant. See fine. - Burril?
  • noun music An agreeable combination of tones simultaneously heard; a consonant chord; consonance; harmony.
  • noun A variety of American grape, with large dark blue (almost black) grapes in compact clusters.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb go together
  • noun a harmonious state of things in general and of their properties (as of colors and sounds); congruity of parts with one another and with the whole
  • noun capital of the state of New Hampshire; located in south central New Hampshire on the Merrimack river
  • verb arrange the words of a text so as to create a concordance
  • verb be in accord; be in agreement
  • noun the determination of grammatical inflection on the basis of word relations
  • noun the first battle of the American Revolution (April 19, 1775)
  • verb arrange by concord or agreement
  • noun town in eastern Massachusetts near Boston where the first battle of the American Revolution was fought
  • noun agreement of opinions

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English concorde, from Old French, from Latin concordia, from concors, concord-, agreeing : com-, com- + cor, heart; see kerd- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From French concorder, from Latin concordo

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From French concorde, Latin concordia, from concors ("of the same mind, agreeing"); con- + cor, cordis ("heart"). See heart, and compare accord

Examples

  • "Live in concord," came to him; but it was not applicable.

    THE CHINAGO

  • Balance is achieved, a harmony of opposites in concord rather than discord (c.f. the robot's voice and clanking).

    Archive 2008-02-01

  • Balance is achieved, a harmony of opposites in concord rather than discord (c.f. the robot's voice and clanking).

    Strange Fiction in the Marketplace

  • The accounts of Jesuit missionaries, the fabulous tales of the Arabian Nights, and the idyllic images on commodities all worked in concord to instill in the national consciousness the idea that China was different, intriguing, and wonderful.

    The Romance of China: Excursions to China in U.S. Culture: 1776-1876

  • I want to say that my own profound conviction is there is absolutely no hope-I would not say for the civilization of mankind-but absolutely no hope for the peace of the world, excepting in concord, unity, and friendship between the English-speaking nations (applause) and that, again, is not sentiment.

    Our International Outlook

  • "Live in concord," came to him; but it was not applicable.

    The Chinago

  • "Live in concord," came to him; but it was not applicable.

    The Chinago

  • Put together the holy nature of God and the unholy nature of man, and what concord is there between them?

    A Refuge from the Storm

  • “From your labors,” was he accustomed to say, (and to say with truth, if not with sincerity,) “from your labors we receive our subsistence; you derive your tranquillity from our vigilance: since, therefore, we are mutually necessary to each other, let us live together like brothers in concord and love.”

    The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

  • The clamor of controversy sometimes provoked the emperor to exclaim, “Hear me! the Franks have heard me, and the Alemanni;” but he soon discovered that he was now engaged with more obstinate and implacable enemies; and though he exerted the powers of oratory to persuade them to live in concord, or at least in peace, he was perfectly satisfied, before he dismissed them from his presence, that he had nothing to dread from the union of the Christians.

    The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

Comments

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  • The H.M.S. Concord was listed as a "transport" captured at Yorktown in 1781. I wonder if it ever fought with another transport named Harmony.

    October 29, 2007

  • "He snapped my bra like a Concord taking off, and I was unhooked for love."

    - no.15 of 'The Top 15 Bad Romance Novel Opening Lines'.

    September 25, 2008