Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • intransitive v. To be of the same opinion; agree: concurred on the issue of preventing crime. See Synonyms at assent.
  • intransitive v. To act together; cooperate.
  • intransitive v. To occur at the same time; coincide: icy sleet that concurred with a forceful wind.
  • intransitive v. Obsolete To converge; meet.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To unite or agree (in action or opinion); to have a common opinion; to coincide; to correspond.
  • v. To meet in the same point; to combine or conjoin; to contribute or help towards a common object or effect.
  • v. To run together; to meet.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • intransitive v. To run together; to meet.
  • intransitive v. To meet in the same point; to combine or conjoin; to contribute or help toward a common object or effect.
  • intransitive v. To unite or agree (in action or opinion); to join; to act jointly; to agree; to coincide; to correspond.
  • intransitive v. To assent; to consent.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To run together; meet in a point in space.
  • To come together or be accordant, as in character, action, or opinion; agree; coincide: followed by with before the person or thing and in before the object of concurrence.
  • To unite; combine; be associated: as, many causes concurred in bringing about his fall.
  • Eccles., to fall on two consecutive days, as two feasts. See concurrence, 4.
  • To assent: with to.
  • In law, to assert, with other claimants, a claim against the estate of an insolvent.
  • In English law, to unite in two or more persons the title to a single estate.
  • n. In mod. geom., the straight determined by two coplanar flat pencils.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. be in accord; be in agreement
  • v. happen simultaneously

Etymologies

Middle English concurren, from Latin concurrere, to meet, coincide : com-, com- + currere, to run; see kers- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin concurrere ("to run together, agree") (Wiktionary)

Examples

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