Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A person who organizes, operates, and assumes the risk for a business venture.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun One who undertakes a large industrial enterprise; a contractor.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Polit. Econ.) One who takes the initiative to create a product or establish a business for profit; generally, whoever undertakes on his own account an enterprise in which others are employed and risks are taken.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A person who organizes and operates a business venture and assumes much of the associated risk.
  • noun A person who organizes a risky activity of any kind and acts substantially in the manner of a business entrepreneur.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun someone who organizes a business venture and assumes the risk for it

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[French, from Old French, from entreprendre, to undertake; see enterprise.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Borrowing from French entrepreneur.

Examples

  • From an etymological point-of-view, the word entrepreneur is based on the Sanskrit word "Antha Prerna," which in translation means "self-motivated."

    Gregory Hosono: Entrepreneurship in 500 Words

  • From an etymological point-of-view, the word entrepreneur is based on the Sanskrit word "Antha Prerna," which in translation means "self-motivated."

    Gregory Hosono: Entrepreneurship in 500 Words

  • The word entrepreneur derives from the French word that refers to the source of the event, the one who initiates.

    The Answer

  • The word entrepreneur derives from the French word that refers to the source of the event, the one who initiates.

    The Answer

  • My understanding is that it was he who invented the term entrepreneur and who coined the phrase in order to explain why the market economy was so successful.

    The Ideas That Conquered the World: Peace, Democracy, and Free Markets in the Twenty-first Century

  • IPO was a set of initials known to most college graduates, and the word entrepreneur hit the covers of books on the New York Times best-seller list.

    HIGH TECH START UP

  • IPO was a set of initials known to most college graduates, and the word entrepreneur hit the covers of books on the New York Times best-seller list.

    HIGH TECH START UP

  • IPO was a set of initials known to most college graduates, and the word entrepreneur hit the covers of books on the New York Times best-seller list.

    HIGH TECH START UP

  • IPO was a set of initials known to most college graduates, and the word entrepreneur hit the covers of books on the New York Times best-seller list.

    HIGH TECH START UP

  • Most commonly, the term entrepreneur applies to someone who creates value by offering a product or service, by carving out a niche in the market that may not exist currently.

    GreenBiz.com Green Business News

Comments

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  • nmw is a "word entrepreneur" -- he (Norbert Mayer-Wittmann) works on the development of online language (he refers to his business as "New Media Works").

    July 4, 2009