Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun One who undertakes a task or job.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun One who undertakes or engages to perform any business; one who engages in any project or business; a projector.
  • noun Specifically— One who stipulates or covenants to perform certain work for another; a contractor.
  • noun One who became surety or guarantee for another, or undertook to answer for him.
  • noun One whose business is to make preparations for the burial of the dead, and to manage funerals.
  • noun In British history, a man of authority or influence who undertook to induce or assure particular legislation; usually, one of those who assured the king that if he would grant some concession, they would undertake that the Commons should vote desired supplies.
  • noun In English history, a contractor for the collection of revenue, or the enforcement of purveyance for the royal household.
  • noun In Scots hist., one of a party of Lowland adventurers who, in the reign of James VI., by authority of the crown, attempted to colonize some of the Hebrides, and so displace the original Celtic population. One of a body of English and Scottish adventurers who, in the latter part of the sixteenth century, undertook to hold lands in Ireland which were regarded as the property of the crown or of Englishmen.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun One who undertakes; one who engages in any project or business.
  • noun One who stipulates or covenants to perform any work for another; a contractor.
  • noun Specifically, one who takes the charge and management of funerals.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A funeral director; someone whose business is to manage funerals, burials and cremations
  • noun historical a person receiving land in Ireland during the Elizabethan era, so named because they gave an undertaking to abide by several conditions regarding loyalty to the crown, marriage, and using English as their spoken language.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun one whose business is the management of funerals

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Sorry, expecting Jindal to be an undertaker is setting the bar way too high.

    Matthew Yglesias » Fox News Panel Pans Jindal

  • Berlin undertaker Walter Mueller said: Bodies that went into the ground 30 years ago look like they went in last week.

    Boing Boing: March 17, 2002 - March 23, 2002 Archives

  • Scoffing at the suggestion that an undertaker is a "professional man," Chambers said any good plumber could learn how to embalm in sixty days.

    The Undertaker's Racket

  • Scoffing at the suggestion that an undertaker is a "professional man," Chambers said any good plumber could learn how to embalm in sixty days.

    The Undertaker's Racket

  • Scoffing at the suggestion that an undertaker is a "professional man," Chambers said any good plumber could learn how to embalm in sixty days.

    The Undertaker's Racket

  • That the undertaker at the same time bears the risks attendant upon production has to be taken into account when we consider the individual undertaker, but not when we consider the institution as such, for we cannot speak of the risk of the body of undertakers as a whole, I called the undertaker, not a man, but a something, because in truth it need not be a man with flesh and blood.

    Freeland A Social Anticipation

  • The business of an undertaker is a refinement of modern civilization.

    Oldtown Folks

  • Didn’t you call an undertaker to provide a coffin, Luther?

    Twilight’s Child

  • Didn’t you call an undertaker to provide a coffin, Luther?

    Twilight’s Child

  • Go to the scene, call Div Surgeon to certify death, afterwards call the undertaker on call and remove body.

    The Love Shack, Baby. « POLICE INSPECTOR BLOG

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