Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • intransitive verb To pledge or contribute (a sum of money).
  • intransitive verb To sign (one's name) at the end of a document, especially to attest to or authenticate it.
  • intransitive verb To sign one's name to (a document) in attestation, testimony, or consent.
  • intransitive verb To authorize (someone) to receive or access electronic texts or services, especially over the Internet.
  • intransitive verb To purchase or claim the shares of (a new issue of stock, bonds, or other securities).
  • intransitive verb To contract to receive and pay for a certain number of issues of a publication, for tickets to a series of events or performances, or for a utility service, for example.
  • intransitive verb To receive or be allowed to access electronic texts or services by subscription.
  • intransitive verb To promise to pay or contribute money.
  • intransitive verb To purchase or claim shares of a new issue of stock, bonds, or other securities.
  • intransitive verb To feel or express hearty approval: synonym: assent.
  • intransitive verb To sign one's name to a document.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To write beneath: said of what is so written or of the handwriting.
  • Hence To sign with one's own hand.
  • By extension To give consent to, as to something written, or to bind one's self to, by Writing one's name beneath: as, to subscribe a covenant or contract. In law subscribe implies a written or printed signature at the end of a document. See sign, 2.
  • To attest by writing one's name beneath.
  • To promise to give or pay, by writing one's name under a written or printed agreement: as, each subscribed $10.
  • To resign; transfer by signing to another.
  • To write down or characterize as.
  • To promise a certain sum verbally, or by signing an agreement; specifically, to undertake to pay a definite amount, in a manner or on conditions agreed upon, for a special purpose: as, to subscribe for a newspaper or for a book (which may be delivered in instalments); to subscribe to a series of entertainments; to subscribe for railway stock; also, to contribute money to any enterprise, benevolent object, etc. In law the word implies that the agreement is made in writing.
  • To give consent; assent as if by signing one's name.
  • To yield; submit.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • transitive verb To write underneath, as one's name; to sign (one's name) to a document.
  • transitive verb To sign with one's own hand; to give consent to, as something written, or to bind one's self to the terms of, by writing one's name beneath.
  • transitive verb To attest by writing one's name beneath.
  • transitive verb To promise to give, by writing one's name with the amount.
  • transitive verb obsolete To sign away; to yield; to surrender.
  • transitive verb obsolete To declare over one's signature; to publish.
  • intransitive verb To sign one's name to a letter or other document.
  • intransitive verb To give consent to something written, by signing one's name; hence, to assent; to agree.
  • intransitive verb rare To become surely; -- with for.
  • intransitive verb obsolete To yield; to admit one's self to be inferior or in the wrong.
  • intransitive verb To set one's name to a paper in token of promise to give a certain sum.
  • intransitive verb To enter one's name for a newspaper, a book, etc.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb ergative To sign up to have copies of a publication, such as a newspaper or a magazine, delivered for a period of time.
  • verb To pay for the provision of a service, such as Internet access or a cell phone plan.
  • verb To believe or agree with a theory or an idea.
  • verb To pay money to be a member of an organization.
  • verb To contribute or promise to contribute money to a common fund.
  • verb To agree to buy shares in a company.
  • verb archaic To write one’s name at the bottom of a document, to sign.
  • verb obsolete To sign away; to yield; to surrender.
  • verb obsolete To yield; to admit to being inferior or in the wrong.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb offer to buy, as of stocks and shares
  • verb mark with one's signature; write one's name (on)
  • verb receive or obtain regularly
  • verb adopt as a belief
  • verb pay (an amount of money) as a contribution to a charity or service, especially at regular intervals

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English subscriben, to sign, from Latin subscrībere : sub-, sub- + scrībere, to write; see skrībh- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Latin sub- ("under") + scribere ("to write")

Examples

  • LORD NORTH, who had a great antipathy to music, being asked why he did not subscribe to the Ancient Concerts, and it being urged as a reason for it that his brother the Bishop of Winchester did, "Ay," replied his lordship, "if I was as _deaf_ as my brother, I would _subscribe too_."

    The Jest Book The Choicest Anecdotes and Sayings

  • Those individuals who did not subscribe from the first issues have found it impossible to complete their files except by photocopying the missing issues.

    Introduction

  • The info about the effort/time to subscribe is sooo true.

    A-List Bloggers Agree: ‘Entertaining Differentiation’ Is Key to Success | Write to Done

  • I have no idea if the “feed” I subscribe is rss, atom, or something else.

    Scripting News for 8/15/07 « Scripting News Annex

  • Those individuals who did not subscribe from the first issues have found it impossible to complete their files except by photocopying the missing issues.

    Introduction

  • Knowing how many people subscribe is useful because it lets you track the ongoing popularity of your show.

    Monkey news! « BuzzMachine

  • I think they'll look to form some sort of worldwide regulatory body which can claim jurisdiction over these type of things but getting everyone to subscribe is gonna be tough.

    Filmstalker: UK Film Censors look to Internet

  • But ... if people can read (and thus get info) they need for free, there's not much of an incentive to subscribe, is there?

    How many registered users?

  • As soon as we got into the street, my companion began to expostulate with me, telling me that it was the height of folly not to make every one who signed his name subscribe something, as Mr. Clark had done, towards defraying our expenses.

    Memoirs of Henry Hunt, Esq. — Volume 2

  • Who knows, at the back of their mind, the word subscribe entails paying for the subscription.

    EzineArticles

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