Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Constituting or amounting to a whole; total: aggregate sales in that market.
  • adj. Botany Crowded or massed into a dense cluster.
  • adj. Composed of a mixture of minerals separable by mechanical means.
  • n. A total considered with reference to its constituent parts; a gross amount: "An empire is the aggregate of many states under one common head” ( Edmund Burke).
  • n. The mineral materials, such as sand or stone, used in making concrete.
  • transitive v. To gather into a mass, sum, or whole.
  • transitive v. To amount to; total.
  • intransitive v. To come together or collect in a mass or whole: "Some [bacteria]aggregate so closely as to mimic a multicellular organism” ( Gina Kolata).
  • idiom in the aggregate Taken into account as a whole: Unit sales for December amounted in the aggregate to 100,000.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A mass, assemblage, or sum of particulars; something consisting of elements but considered as a whole.
  • n. A mass formed by the union of homogeneous particles; – in distinction from a compound, formed by the union of heterogeneous particles.
  • n. A set (collection of objects).
  • n. The full chromatic scale of twelve equal tempered pitches.
  • n. Crushed stone, crushed slag or water-worn gravel used for surfacing a built-up roof system.
  • n. Solid particles of low aspect ratio added to a composite material, as distinguished from the matrix and any fibers or reinforcements, especially the gravel and sand added to concrete. (technical)
  • adj. Formed by a collection of particulars into a whole mass or sum; collective; combined; added up
  • adj. Consisting or formed of smaller objects or parts.
  • adj. Formed into clusters or groups of lobules.
  • adj. Composed of several florets within a common involucre, as in the daisy; or of several carpels formed from one flower, as in the raspberry.
  • adj. Having the several component parts adherent to each other only to such a degree as to be separable by mechanical means.
  • adj. United into a common organized mass; said of certain compound animals.
  • v. To bring together; to collect into a mass or sum.
  • v. To add or unite, as, a person, to an association.
  • v. To amount in the aggregate to.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Formed by a collection of particulars into a whole mass or sum; collective.
  • adj. Formed into clusters or groups of lobules.
  • adj. Composed of several florets within a common involucre, as in the daisy; or of several carpels formed from one flower, as in the raspberry.
  • adj. Having the several component parts adherent to each other only to such a degree as to be separable by mechanical means.
  • adj. United into a common organized mass; -- said of certain compound animals.
  • n. A mass, assemblage, or sum of particulars
  • n. A mass formed by the union of homogeneous particles; -- in distinction from a compound, formed by the union of heterogeneous particles.
  • transitive v. To bring together; to collect into a mass or sum. “The aggregated soil.”
  • transitive v. To add or unite, .
  • transitive v. To amount in the aggregate to.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To bring together; collect into a sum, mass, or body: as, “the aggregated soil,” Milton, P. L., x. 293.
  • To amount to (the number of); make (the sum or total of): an elliptical use.
  • To add or unite to as a constituent member; make a part of the aggregate of: as, to aggregate a person to a company or society.
  • To come together into a sum or mass; combine and form a collection or mass.
  • Formed by the conjunction or collection of particulars into a whole mass or sum; total; combined: as, the aggregate amount of indebtedness.
  • Specifically— In geology, composed of several different mineral constituents capable of being separated by mechanical means: as, granite is an aggregate rock.
  • In anatomy, clustered: as, aggregate glands (Peyer's glands)
  • In botany, forming a dense cluster. In zoology, compound; associated. In law, composed of many individuals united into one association.
  • n. A sum, mass, or assemblage of particulars; a total or gross amount; any combined whole considered with reference to its constituent parts.
  • n. Any hard material added to lime to make concrete.
  • n. Milit., the total commissioned and enlisted force of any post, department, division, corps, or other command.
  • n. In logic, a whole of aggregants which is universally predicable of every one of its aggregants and is not predicable of any individual of which none of its aggregants is predicable.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. amount in the aggregate to
  • v. gather in a mass, sum, or whole
  • n. a sum total of many heterogenous things taken together
  • n. the whole amount
  • adj. composed of a dense cluster of separate units such as carpels or florets or drupelets
  • n. material such as sand or gravel used with cement and water to make concrete, mortar, or plaster
  • adj. formed of separate units gathered into a mass or whole

Etymologies

Middle English aggregat, from Latin aggregātus, past participle of aggregāre, to add to : ad-, ad- + gregāre, to collect (from grex, greg-, flock.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin aggregātus, perfect passive participle of aggregō ("I flock together"), from ag-, combining form of ad ("to, toward"), + gregō ("I flock or group"), from grex ("flock"). Compare gregarious. (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • Species death like this is nothing more than a shift in the aggregate psychic agenda. From "The Last Werewolf" by Glen Duncan.

    March 3, 2012

  • This word is typed with three fingers of the left hand, a joy for lefties like me. Who needs a right hand anyway?

    February 26, 2011

  • In botany, used to describe a plant or flower formed of florets collected in a dense cluster but not cohering, as the daisy. Also used to describe fruit that's composed of a cluster of carpels belonging to the same flower, such as the raspberry.

    November 14, 2007