Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Mathematics A bar drawn over two or more algebraic terms to indicate that they are to be treated as a single term.
  • noun Anatomy A bandlike structure, such as a ligament.
  • noun A bond or tie.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A bond of union; a bond; a tie.
  • noun In algebra, a character in the form of a stroke or brace drawn over a quantity when it consists of several terms, in order to connect them together as one quantity and show that they are to be multiplied or divided, etc., together: thus, , indicates that the sum of a and b is to be multiplied by c; whereas the expression without this character would indicate simply that b is to be multiplied by c, and the product added to adjective
  • noun In printing, a brace.
  • noun In anatomy, a tendinous or ligamentous band uniting certain parts; a frenum.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A bond of union; a tie.
  • noun (Math.) A straight, horizontal mark placed over two or more members of a compound quantity, which are to be subjected to the same operation, as in the expression x2 + y2 - x + y.
  • noun (Anat.) A band or bundle of fibers; a frænum.
  • noun (Zoöl.) A commissure uniting the two main tendons in the foot of certain birds.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A bond or link signifying union.
  • noun arithmetic, obsolete Any symbol used to group some of the terms in an expression, indicating that that part of the calculation should be done before other parts.
  • noun arithmetic A horizontal line over the top of some of the terms in an expression, indicating that that part of the calculation is to be done before other parts.
  • noun Australia, arithmetic Specifically, the horizontal line between the numerator and denominator in a fraction.
  • noun anatomy A ligament that limits the movement of an organ or part.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Latin, bond, tie, from vincīre, to tie.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin vinculum ("bond, link"), from vinciō ("bind, fetter, tie") + -ulum.

Examples

  • The vinculum is the primary node aboard each ship that connects its drones to the Borg collective mind and to the various systems and subsystems of each individual vessel.

    The Starfleet Survival Guide

  • Located in the core of each major Borg vessel is a singular device known as a vinculum.

    The Starfleet Survival Guide

  • The vinculum is the primary node aboard each ship that connects its drones to the Borg collective mind and to the various systems and subsystems of each individual vessel.

    The Starfleet Survival Guide

  • The vinculum is the primary node aboard each ship that connects its drones to the Borg collective mind and to the various systems and subsystems of each individual vessel.

    The Starfleet Survival Guide

  • The vinculum is the primary node aboard each ship that connects its drones to the Borg collective mind and to the various systems and subsystems of each individual vessel.

    The Starfleet Survival Guide

  • Located in the core of each major Borg vessel is a singular device known as a vinculum.

    The Starfleet Survival Guide

  • Located in the core of each major Borg vessel is a singular device known as a vinculum.

    The Starfleet Survival Guide

  • Located in the core of each major Borg vessel is a singular device known as a vinculum.

    The Starfleet Survival Guide

  • It is the marriage bond or "vinculum" which is the essence of the marriage state or permanent marriage contract, not the use of the marriage rights.

    Mary Victrix

  • In the environment of liquids and nasals a parasitic vowel sometimes develops; as, -- vinculum for earlier vinclum.

    New Latin Grammar

Comments

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  • In mathematics, a bar drawn over two or more algebraic terms to indicate that they are to be treated as a single term.

    April 3, 2008

  • See citations on radical and overline.

    July 27, 2018