Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A growing together of bones originally separate, as of the two pubic bones or the two halves of the lower jawbone.
  • noun A line or junction thus formed.
  • noun An articulation in which bones are united by cartilage without a synovial membrane.
  • noun The coalescence of similar parts or organs.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In anatomy and zoology: The union or connection of bones in the middle line of the body, either by confluence, by direct apposition, or by the intervention of cartilage or ligament; also, the part, or configuration of parts, resulting from such union or connection.
  • noun Some point or line of union between two parts; a commissure; a chiasm: as, the symphysis of the optic nerves.
  • noun Attachment of one part to another; a growing together; insertion or gomphosis with union: as, the symphysis of teeth with the jaw. See acrodont, pleurodont.
  • noun Coalescence or growing together of parts so as to close a natural passage; atresia.
  • noun In botany, a coalescence or growing together of similar parts.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun An articulation formed by intervening cartilage.
  • noun The union or coalescence of bones; also, the place of union or coalescence. Cf. articulation.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The process of two, originally separate bones growing together as the mammalian subject matures, as with the pubic bones or lower jawbones in humans.
  • noun A line discernable on X-ray showing such fusion.
  • noun The cartilaginous material that adjoins and facilitates the junction of such bones, with or without synovia.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a growing together of parts or structures
  • noun an abnormal adhesion of two or more structures

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Greek sumphusis, from sumphuein, to cause to grow together : sun-, syn- + phuein, to cause to grow; see bheuə- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Ancient Greek, via sym- + φύσις ("growth")

Examples

  • Extending upward and backward on either side from the lower part of the symphysis is the mylohyoid line, which gives origin to the Mylohyoideus; the posterior part of this line, near the alveolar margin, gives attachment to a small part of the Constrictor pharyngis superior, and to the pterygomandibular raphé.

    II. Osteology. 5b. 8. The Mandible (Lower Jaw)

  • Near the lower part of the symphysis is a pair of laterally placed spines, termed the mental spines, which give origin to the Genioglossi.

    II. Osteology. 5b. 8. The Mandible (Lower Jaw)

  • The first form is termed a symphysis (Fig. 298), the second a syndesmosis.

    III. Syndesmology. 3. Classification of Joints

  • The study, published in the British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, also found that obese women had a more than three-fold increased risk of suffering from a condition known as symphysis-pubis dysfunction, which affects the pelvic joints and may cause walking difficulties if severe.

    Medlogs - Recent stories

  • The study, published in the British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, also found that obese women had a more than three-fold increased risk of suffering from a condition known as symphysis-pubis dysfunction, which affects the pelvic joints and may cause walking difficulties if severe.

    EurekAlert! - Breaking News

  • Sometimes in pregnancy or during birth, the pubic joint in the front of the pelvis pubic symphysis widens or separates, causing some women to experience mild to debilitating pain in the pubic region after giving birth.

    Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn

  • Pubic symphysis ache, neck tension, even when I turned my ankle, she fixed me right up.

    I’ve got the full-of-baby whines « A Bird’s Nest

  • Sometimes in pregnancy or during birth, the pubic joint in the front of the pelvis pubic symphysis widens or separates, causing some women to experience mild to debilitating pain in the pubic region after giving birth.

    Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn

  • Strain or separation of pubic symphysis joint or sciatica pain in the lower back from pelvic joint stress

    Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn

  • Separation of pubic symphysis cartilage between the pubic bones in the front of your pelvis

    Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn

Comments

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  • "'In the frigate-bird the symphysis of the furcula coalesces with the carina and the upper end of each ramus with the caracoid, while in turn each caracoid coalesces with the proximal end of the scapula! ... I believe this to be unique among existing birds, and closely related to the creature's flight.'"

    --O'Brian, The Wine-Dark Sea, 87

    March 14, 2008