Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A keel-shaped ridge or structure, such as that on the breastbone of a bird or of the fused lower two petals of flowers of many members of the pea family.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A longitudinal ridge or projection like the keel of a boat.
  • n. Part of a papilionaceous flower consisting of two petals, commonly united, which encloses the organs of fructification.
  • n. The keel of the breastbone of birds.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A keel.
  • n. That part of a papilionaceous flower, consisting of two petals, commonly united, which incloses the organs of fructification.
  • n. A longitudinal ridge or projection like the keel of a boat.
  • n. The keel of the breastbone of birds.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. pl. carinæ (-nē). [L., the keel of a boat: see careen.] A keel.
  • n. An intermediate piece, between the tergum and the scutum, of the multivalve carapace of a cirriped, as a barnacle or an acorn-shell. See cuts under Balanus and Lepas.
  • n. [capitalized] In astronomy, one of the four parts into which the constellation Argo is divided. See Argo.
  • n. One of the vertical cross-bars on the septa of a coral.
  • n. In entomology, any keel-like elevation of the body-wall of an insect, as the pronotal carina of many grasshoppers.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a keel-shaped constellation in the southern hemisphere; contains the start Canopus
  • n. any of various keel-shaped structures or ridges such as that on the breastbone of a bird or that formed by the fused petals of a pea blossom

Etymologies

Latin carīna, keel; see kar- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin carina ("keel"). (Wiktionary)

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