Help support Wordnik by adopting your favorite word!

Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A single complete movement of a threaded needle in sewing or surgical suturing.
  • n. A single loop of yarn around an implement such as a knitting needle.
  • n. The link, loop, or knot made in this way.
  • n. A mode of arranging the threads in sewing, knitting, or crocheting: a purl stitch.
  • n. A sudden sharp pain, especially in the side. See Synonyms at pain.
  • n. Informal An article of clothing: wore not a stitch.
  • n. Informal The least part; a bit: didn't do a stitch of work.
  • n. A ridge between two furrows.
  • transitive v. To fasten or join with or as if with stitches.
  • transitive v. To mend or repair with stitches: stitched up the tear.
  • transitive v. To decorate or ornament with or as if with stitches: "The sky was stitched with stars” ( Mario Puzo).
  • transitive v. To fasten together with staples or thread.
  • intransitive v. To make stitches; sew.
  • idiom in stitches Informal Laughing uncontrollably.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A single pass of a needle in sewing; the loop or turn of the thread thus made.
  • n. An arrangement of stitches in sewing, or method of stitching in some particular way or style.
  • n. An intense stabbing pain under the lower edge of the ribcage, caused by internal organs pulling downwards on the diaphragm during exercise.
  • n. A single turn of the thread round a needle in knitting; a link, or loop, of yarn
  • n. An arrangement of stitches in knitting, or method of knitting in some particular way or style.
  • n. A space of work taken up, or gone over, in a single pass of the needle.
  • n. Hence, by extension, any space passed over; distance.
  • n. A local sharp pain; an acute pain, like the piercing of a needle.
  • n. A contortion, or twist.
  • n. Any least part of a fabric or dress.
  • n. A furrow. (Chapman)
  • v. To form stitches in; especially, to sew in such a manner as to show on the surface a continuous line of stitches.
  • v. To sew, or unite or attach by stitches.
  • v. To form land into ridges.
  • v. To practice/practise stitching or needlework.
  • v. To combine two or more photographs of the same scene into a single image.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A single pass of a needle in sewing; the loop or turn of the thread thus made.
  • n. A single turn of the thread round a needle in knitting; a link, or loop, of yarn
  • n. A space of work taken up, or gone over, in a single pass of the needle; hence, by extension, any space passed over; distance.
  • n. A local sharp pain; an acute pain, like the piercing of a needle.
  • n. A contortion, or twist.
  • n. Any least part of a fabric or dress.
  • n. A furrow.
  • n. An arrangement of stitches, or method of stitching in some particular way or style
  • intransitive v. To practice stitching, or needlework.
  • transitive v. To form stitches in; especially, to sew in such a manner as to show on the surface a continuous line of stitches.
  • transitive v. To sew, or unite together by stitches.
  • transitive v. To form land into ridges.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To unite by stitches; sew.
  • To ornament with stitches.
  • In agriculture, to form into ridges.
  • To mend or unite with a needle and thread: as, to stitch up a rent; to stitch up an artery.
  • To sew; make stitches.
  • In weaving, to unite by concealed threads, either warp or filling or both, (two or more fabrics), so that they shall appear as one, forming a two-ply, three-ply, etc., fabric.
  • In bookbinding, to pass a thread or flexible wire through perforations made near the back fold of the assembled sections of (an unbound book).
  • n. An acute sudden pain like that produced by the thrust of a needle; a sharp spasmodic pain, especially in the intercostal muscles: as, a stitch in the side. Such pains in the side may be myalgic, neuralgic, pleuritic, or due to muscular cramp.
  • n. A contortion; a grimace; a twist of the face.
  • n. In sewing: One movement of a threaded needle, passing in and out of the fabric, and uniting two parts by the thread, which is drawn tight after each insertion.
  • n. The part of the thread left in the fabric by this movement.
  • n. In knitting, netting, crochet, embroidery, lace-making, etc.: One whole movement of the implement or implements used, as knitting-needles, bobbins, hook, etc.
  • n. The result of this movement, shown in the work itself.
  • n. The kind or style of work produced by stitching: as, buttonhole-stitch; cross-stitch; pillowlace stitch; by extension, a kind or style of work with the loom. For stitches in lace, see point. See also whip-stitch.
  • n. Distance passed over at one time; stretch; distance; way.
  • n. In agriculture, a space between two double furrows in plowed ground; a furrow or ridge.
  • n. A bit of clothing; a rag: as, he had not a dry stitch on.
  • n. In bookbinding, a connection of leaves or pieces of paper, through perforations an inch or so apart, with thread or wire.
  • n. (See also backstitch, chain-stitch, crewel-stitch, cross-stitch, feather-stitch, hemstitch, lock-stitch, rope-stitch, spider-stitch, stem-stitch, streak-stitch, etc.)
  • n. Same as suture.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. fasten by sewing; do needlework
  • n. a link or loop or knot made by an implement in knitting, crocheting, embroidery, or sewing
  • n. a sharp spasm of pain in the side resulting from running

Etymologies

Middle English stiche, from Old English stice, sting; see steig- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English stiche, from Old English stiċe ("a prick, puncture, stab, thrust with a pointed implement, pricking sensation, stitch, pain in the side, sting"), from Proto-Germanic *stikiz (“prick, piercing, stitch”), from Proto-Indo-European *steg- (“to stab, pierce”). Cognate with Dutch steek ("prick, stitch"), German Stich ("a prick, piercing, stitch"), Old English stician ("to stick, stab, pierce, prick"). More at stick. (Wiktionary)
From Old English stiċian (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Turn, chain 3, 1 dc in same stitch, 1 dc in next stitch, * 2 dc in next stitch, 1 dc in next stitch* [36 dc].

    iToot Stream

  • * Dc in next stitch, slip stitch in same stitch* Slip stitch into the chain 1.

    iToot Stream

  • 'Net' ... fascinating piece by Bob Geldof in today's Belfast Telegraph in which Sir Bob rather blows the whistle on what he calls a stitch up by Sir Patrick McCormack's Northern Ireland Affairs committee …

    Slugger O'Toole

  • A machine stitch is better and more professional looking, but you can sew a garment together by hand.

    "The Pink Rose" by Federico Andreotti (1847-1930)

  • I agree that garter stitch is demanding, somehow stocking stitch is more forgiving.

    Jean's Knitting

  • Garter stitch is tough, and there are imperfections.

    Jean's Knitting

  • Garter stitch is very demanding, and I think there were also faults in my alignment of the mitres.

    Jean's Knitting

  • Every row ends by knitting up one stitch from the reserves.

    Archive 2009-02-01

  • And because my house has been so chaotic that a little cross-stitch is about the only thing I've had the chance to do - luckily, the hallway decoration and the living room are now both DONE!!

    Noel, noel

  • Great to sew through and so firm I don't need card, which means I can use a fabric back, which means if I use a really heavy satin stitch for the border, it doesn't come loose (which it often does, with paper).

    More cheer!

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • I think that usage comes from the idea of laughing so hard you get a stitch. Am I right?

    July 18, 2008

  • Ha ha ha! You leave me in stitches!

    February 24, 2008

  • slang for a laugh or a person who has a great sense of humor and makes us laugh.
    That's a stitch! or You're a stitch!

    February 24, 2008