Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The act of closing or the state of being closed.
  • noun Something that closes or shuts.
  • noun A bringing to an end; a conclusion.
  • noun A bringing to an end; a conclusion.
  • noun A feeling of finality or resolution, especially after a traumatic experience.
  • noun The property of being mathematically closed.
  • transitive verb To cloture (a debate).

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The act of shutting, or the state of being closed; a closing or shutting up.
  • noun That by which anything is closed or shut; a means of closing.
  • noun Inclosure; also, that which incloses, bounds, covers, or shuts in.
  • noun Conclusion; end.
  • noun In legislation, the closing or stoppage of a debate: in the British House of Commons, the cutting off of debate so as to prevent further discussion or motions by the minority and cause a direct vote to be taken on the question before the House: often used in the French form clôture.
  • In England, to end by closure. See closure, n., 5.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The act of shutting; a closing.
  • noun That which closes or shuts; that by which separate parts are fastened or closed.
  • noun That which incloses or confines; an inclosure.
  • noun obsolete A conclusion; an end.
  • noun (Parliamentary Practice) A method of putting an end to debate and securing an immediate vote upon a measure before a legislative body. It is similar in effect to the previous question. It was first introduced into the British House of Commons in 1882. The French word clôture was originally applied to this proceeding.
  • noun (Math.) the property of being mathematically closed under some operation; -- said of sets.
  • noun (Math.) the intersection of all closed sets containing the given set.
  • noun (Psychol.) achievement of a sense of completeness and release from tension due to uncertainty; ; also, the sense of completion thus achieved.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun An event or occurrence that signifies an ending.
  • noun A feeling of completeness; the experience of an emotional conclusion, usually to a difficult period.
  • noun A device to facilitate temporary and repeatable opening and closing.
  • noun computer science An abstraction that represents a function within an environment, a context consisting of the variables that are both bound at a particular time during the execution of the program and that are within the function's scope.
  • noun mathematics The smallest set that both includes a given subset and possesses some given property.
  • noun topology, of a set The smallest closed set which contains the given set.
  • noun The act of shutting; a closing.
  • noun That which closes or shuts; that by which separate parts are fastened or closed.
  • noun obsolete That which encloses or confines; an enclosure.
  • noun A method of ending a parliamentary debate and securing an immediate vote upon a measure before a legislative body.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun an obstruction in a pipe or tube
  • noun approaching a particular destination; a coming closer; a narrowing of a gap
  • noun termination of operations
  • noun a Gestalt principle of organization holding that there is an innate tendency to perceive incomplete objects as complete and to close or fill gaps and to perceive asymmetric stimuli as symmetric
  • noun something settled or resolved; the outcome of decision making
  • verb terminate debate by calling for a vote
  • noun the act of blocking
  • noun a rule for limiting or ending debate in a deliberative body

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin clausūra, fortress, lock, from clausus, enclosed; see close. Sense 4, translation of French clôture.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old French closure, from Latin clausura, from claudere ("to close"); see clausure and close.

Examples

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