Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A sharp, sudden physical pain. See Synonyms at pain.
  • n. A mental or emotional pain: a twinge of guilt.
  • transitive v. To cause to feel a sharp pain.
  • transitive v. Obsolete To tweak; pinch.
  • intransitive v. To feel a twinge or twinges.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A pinch; a tweak; a twitch.
  • n. A sudden sharp pain; a darting local pain of momentary continuance; as, a twinge in the arm or side.
  • v. To pull with a twitch; to pinch; to tweak.
  • v. To affect with a sharp, sudden pain; to torment with pinching or sharp pains.
  • v. To have a sudden, sharp, local pain, like a twitch; to suffer a keen, darting, or shooting pain; as, the side twinges.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To pull with a twitch; to pinch; to tweak.
  • transitive v. To affect with a sharp, sudden pain; to torment with pinching or sharp pains.
  • intransitive v. To have a sudden, sharp, local pain, like a twitch; to suffer a keen, darting, or shooting pain.
  • n. A pinch; a tweak; a twitch.
  • n. A sudden sharp pain; a darting local pain of momentary continuance.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To press; constrain; oppress; affiict.
  • To pull with a sharp, pinching jerk; tweak; twitch.
  • To torment with sharp, darting pains; sting: said of physical or mental pain.
  • To have a sharp, jerking pain, like a twitch; suffer a keen, shooting pain.
  • n. A nipping or pinching; a twitch; a tweak.
  • n. A sharp, darting pain of momentary continuance; a pang, physical or mental.
  • n. Synonyms See pain and agony.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. cause a stinging pain
  • v. feel a sudden sharp, local pain
  • v. squeeze tightly between the fingers
  • n. a sharp stab of pain
  • n. a sudden sharp feeling

Etymologies

From Middle English twengen, to pinch, from Old English twengan.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old English twengan. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • One stoical person’s mild twinge is another, more sensitive patient’s agony.

    On a scale of one to ten...

  • The delicate crystalline structure which had risen in the wake of his twinge was the result.

    Sentenced To Prism

  • Following Sunday's 30-16 loss to the Rams, Bidwell said he felt a "twinge" on his final punt earlier that afternoon.

    Early signs on Bidwell's hip are not encouraging

  • McCain gives me that ... well ... that imperial Romanesque kind of twinge in my belly.

    Several protesters interrupt McCain speech

  • Suffice it to say that if I feel any kind of twinge, I wait awhile to see if it's worth the time investment to go.

    Chaos Theory:

  • I am not more straight-laced than many people, yet I confess it always gives me a kind of twinge to see a young man yielding to intemperance of any kind.

    Alone

  • However, the bi-polar Albert Square resident is in for a fright when she feels a "twinge" in her tummy and worries she is losing the baby.

    Femalefirst.co.uk - Celebrity Gossip + Lifestyle Magazine

  • Mine started as a "twinge" in my neck almost as if I had pinched a nerve.

    California Literary Review

  • When she's feeling that "twinge" Ali says she soon remembers that she's fortunate Estela and Felicitas have each other in their lives.

    Celebrity Baby Blog - People.com

  • Only a little "twinge" on the mixed guidance and the fact that despite the revenue graph going up, up, up, they never seem to generate much in the way of profits.

    Daring Fireball

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